lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2022]   [Jan]   [26]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 3/3] ARM: dts: qcom: basic HP TouchPad support
On Tue, Jan 25, 2022 at 10:13:00PM -0600, Bjorn Andersson wrote:
> On Mon 24 Jan 20:07 CST 2022, Ben Wolsieffer wrote:
>
> > Modify the Dragonboard device tree to support the most basic hardware on
> > the HP TouchPad. The headphone UART port and eMMC are supported.
> >
>
> We typically don't have one commit for the cloning and then one to
> update the content, in particular since your diffstat became rather
> weird.
>
> That said, got some comments below, things that I wouldn't have spotted
> if you sent this as just a new file.

Ok, I'll squash those for v2.

> > - dragon_sdcc1_pins: sdcc1 {
> > + /* eMMC pins, all 8 data lines connected */
> > + emmc_pins: sdcc1 {
> > mux {
> > pins = "gpio159", "gpio160", "gpio161",
> > "gpio162", "gpio163", "gpio164",
> > "gpio165", "gpio166", "gpio167",
> > "gpio168";
> > - function = "sdc1";
> > + function = "sdc1";
> > };
> > clk {
> > pins = "gpio167"; /* SDC1 CLK */
> [..]
> > @@ -171,205 +77,33 @@ pinconf {
> > };
> > };
> >
> > - dragon_gsbi12_i2c_pins: gsbi12_i2c {
> > - mux {
> > - pins = "gpio115", "gpio116";
> > - function = "gsbi12";
> > - };
> > - pinconf {
> > - pins = "gpio115", "gpio116";
> > - drive-strength = <16>;
> > - /* These have external pull-up 4.7kOhm to 1.8V */
> > - bias-disable;
> > - };
> > - };
> > -
> > - /* Primary serial port uart 0 pins */
> > - dragon_gsbi12_serial_pins: gsbi12_serial {
> > + /* Headphone UART pins */
> > + headphone_uart_pins: gsbi12_serial {
> > mux {
> > pins = "gpio117", "gpio118";
> > function = "gsbi12";
> > };
> > - tx {
> > - pins = "gpio117";
> > - drive-strength = <8>;
> > - bias-disable;
> > - };
> > rx {
> > - pins = "gpio118";
> > + pins = "gpio117";
> > drive-strength = <2>;
> > bias-pull-up;
> > };
> > - };
>
> I find it hard to conclude what the resulting snippet is from this
> chunk, did rx swap place from gpio118 to gpio117?

Yes, I made that swap based on comments in the downstream kernel, but,
now that I think about it, there's a good chance those comments are
wrong. The downstream kernel configures both pins as 8 mA drive with no
bias, so no one would ever notice that they were swapped. I think I'll
swap them back in v2. In practice I think the pin configuration makes
little difference, but should I keep the config from the Dragonboard or
match the downstream kernel?

> [..]
> > @@ -814,14 +378,16 @@ l20 {
> > bias-pull-down;
> > };
> > l21 {
> > - // 1.1 V according to schematic
> > regulator-min-microvolt = <1200000>;
> > regulator-max-microvolt = <1200000>;
> > bias-pull-down;
> > - regulator-always-on;
> > + /*
> > + * RPM driver can't handle always-on regulators that are
> > + * supplied by regulators initialized after them.
> > + */
>
> That looks like an oversight that should be corrected, perhaps it needs
> similar attention that was given to the smd-rpm driver recently?
>
> But this makes me wonder, how can this work on the other board? Linus?

It probably doesn't work as intended, but doesn't cause a major
problem either. I only noticed the failure while looking through dmesg.
As soon as the RPM driver probe gets to an always on regulator with a not
yet initialized supply, devm_regulator_register() returns -EAGAIN, it
breaks out of the loop, and the rest of the regulators don't get
initialized. The initialization is retried several times during boot
(because of -EAGAIN), but always fails at the same spot. This doesn't
actually seem to cause any visible problem, other than errors in dmesg.

I tried making the driver continue to initialize the rest of the
regulators even if one fails with -EAGAIN, but still return -EAGAIN from
probe(). My thought was that this would cause probe to be retried later,
and initialization would succeed now that the supply regulators were
available, but instead it seems to hang before any console output.

I don't know if the regulator supplies are correct either, because the
downstream kernel doesn't specify them. I also know next to nothing about
the RPM, so I would definitely appreciate a review from someone familiar
with it.

> > + // regulator-always-on;
> > };
> > l22 {
> > - // 1.2 V according to schematic
> > regulator-min-microvolt = <1150000>;
> > regulator-max-microvolt = <1150000>;
> > bias-pull-down;
> > @@ -845,7 +411,7 @@ l25 {
> > };
> >
> > s0 {
> > - // regulator-min-microvolt = <500000>;
> > + // regulator-min-microvolt = <800000>;
> > // regulator-max-microvolt = <1325000>;
>
> This looks like the full range the regulator could do, do you see a
> reason for documenting that here? Unless there's a good reason I think
> you should leave the commented min/max out.

That was just copied from the Dragonboard DTS, with updated values from
the downstream kernel. I assume some kind of voltage/frequency scaling
driver is needed to actually support a range of voltages here, so I
guess the comments could serve as a reference if that was ever
implemented.

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2022-01-27 03:34    [W:0.379 / U:0.276 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site