lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Aug]   [11]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: file metadata via fs API (was: [GIT PULL] Filesystem Information)
On Di, 11.08.20 20:49, Miklos Szeredi (miklos@szeredi.hu) wrote:

> On Tue, Aug 11, 2020 at 6:05 PM Linus Torvalds
> <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> wrote:
>
> > and then people do "$(srctree)/". If you haven't seen that kind of
> > pattern where the pathname has two (or sometimes more!) slashes in the
> > middle, you've led a very sheltered life.
>
> Oh, I have. That's why I opted for triple slashes, since that should
> work most of the time even in those concatenated cases. And yes, I
> know, most is not always, and this might just be hiding bugs, etc...
> I think the pragmatic approach would be to try this and see how many
> triple slash hits a normal workload gets and if it's reasonably low,
> then hopefully that together with warnings for O_ALT would be enough.

There's no point. Userspace relies on the current meaning of triple
slashes. It really does.

I know many places in systemd where we might end up with a triple
slash. Here's a real-life example: some code wants to access the
cgroup attribute 'cgroup.controllers' of the root cgroup. It thus
generates the right path in the fs for it, which is the concatenation of
"/sys/fs/cgroup/" (because that's where cgroupfs is mounted), of "/"
(i.e. for the root cgroup) and of "/cgroup.controllers" (as that's the
file the attribute is exposed under).

And there you go:

"/sys/fs/cgroup/" + "/" + "/cgroup.controllers" → "/sys/fs/cgroup///cgroup.controllers"

This is a real-life thing. Don't break this please.

Lennart

--
Lennart Poettering, Berlin

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-08-11 21:31    [W:0.135 / U:1.352 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site