lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2020]   [Nov]   [2]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH v5 14/21] kprobes: Remove NMI context check
On Mon, 2 Nov 2020 14:11:38 +0900
Masami Hiramatsu <mhiramat@kernel.org> wrote:

> On Fri, 30 Oct 2020 21:38:31 -0400
> Steven Rostedt <rostedt@goodmis.org> wrote:
>
> > On Sat, 29 Aug 2020 22:02:36 +0900
> > Masami Hiramatsu <mhiramat@kernel.org> wrote:
> >
> > > Since the commit 9b38cc704e84 ("kretprobe: Prevent triggering
> > > kretprobe from within kprobe_flush_task") sets a dummy current
> > > kprobe in the trampoline handler by kprobe_busy_begin/end(),
> > > it is not possible to run a kretprobe pre handler in kretprobe
> > > trampoline handler context even with the NMI. If the NMI interrupts
> > > a kretprobe_trampoline_handler() and it hits a kretprobe, the
> > > 2nd kretprobe will detect recursion correctly and it will be
> > > skipped.
> > > This means we have almost no double-lock issue on kretprobes by NMI.
> > >
> > > The last one point is in cleanup_rp_inst() which also takes
> > > kretprobe_table_lock without setting up current kprobes.
> > > So adding kprobe_busy_begin/end() there allows us to remove
> > > in_nmi() check.
> > >
> > > The above commit applies kprobe_busy_begin/end() on x86, but
> > > now all arch implementation are unified to generic one, we can
> > > safely remove the in_nmi() check from arch independent code.
> > >
> >
> > So are you saying that lockdep is lying?
> >
> > Kprobe smoke test: started
> >
> > ================================
> > WARNING: inconsistent lock state
> > 5.10.0-rc1-test+ #29 Not tainted
> > --------------------------------
> > inconsistent {INITIAL USE} -> {IN-NMI} usage.
> > swapper/0/1 [HC1[1]:SC0[0]:HE0:SE1] takes:
> > ffffffff82b07118 (&rp->lock){....}-{2:2}, at: pre_handler_kretprobe+0x4b/0x193
> > {INITIAL USE} state was registered at:
> > lock_acquire+0x280/0x325
> > _raw_spin_lock+0x30/0x3f
> > recycle_rp_inst+0x3f/0x86
> > __kretprobe_trampoline_handler+0x13a/0x177
> > trampoline_handler+0x48/0x57
> > kretprobe_trampoline+0x2a/0x4f
> > kretprobe_trampoline+0x0/0x4f
> > init_kprobes+0x193/0x19d
> > do_one_initcall+0xf9/0x27e
> > kernel_init_freeable+0x16e/0x2b6
> > kernel_init+0xe/0x109
> > ret_from_fork+0x22/0x30
> > irq event stamp: 1670
> > hardirqs last enabled at (1669): [<ffffffff811cc344>] slab_free_freelist_hook+0xb4/0xfd
> > hardirqs last disabled at (1670): [<ffffffff81da0887>] exc_int3+0xae/0x10a
> > softirqs last enabled at (1484): [<ffffffff82000352>] __do_softirq+0x352/0x38d
> > softirqs last disabled at (1471): [<ffffffff81e00f82>] asm_call_irq_on_stack+0x12/0x20
> >
> > other info that might help us debug this:
> > Possible unsafe locking scenario:
> >
> > CPU0
> > ----
> > lock(&rp->lock);
> > <Interrupt>
> > lock(&rp->lock);
> >
> > *** DEADLOCK ***
> >
> > no locks held by swapper/0/1.
> >
> > stack backtrace:
> > CPU: 0 PID: 1 Comm: swapper/0 Not tainted 5.10.0-rc1-test+ #29
> > Hardware name: MSI MS-7823/CSM-H87M-G43 (MS-7823), BIOS V1.6 02/22/2014
> > Call Trace:
> > dump_stack+0x7d/0x9f
> > print_usage_bug+0x1c0/0x1d3
> > lock_acquire+0x302/0x325
> > ? pre_handler_kretprobe+0x4b/0x193
> > ? stop_machine_from_inactive_cpu+0x120/0x120
> > _raw_spin_lock_irqsave+0x43/0x58
> > ? pre_handler_kretprobe+0x4b/0x193
> > pre_handler_kretprobe+0x4b/0x193
> > ? stop_machine_from_inactive_cpu+0x120/0x120
> > ? kprobe_target+0x1/0x16
> > kprobe_int3_handler+0xd0/0x109
> > exc_int3+0xb8/0x10a
> > asm_exc_int3+0x31/0x40
> > RIP: 0010:kprobe_target+0x1/0x16
> > 5d c3 cc
> > RSP: 0000:ffffc90000033e00 EFLAGS: 00000246
> > RAX: ffffffff8110ea77 RBX: 0000000000000001 RCX: ffffc90000033cb4
> > RDX: 0000000000000231 RSI: 0000000000000000 RDI: 000000003ca57c35
> > RBP: ffffc90000033e20 R08: 0000000000000000 R09: ffffffff8111d207
> > R10: ffff8881002ab480 R11: ffff8881002ab480 R12: 0000000000000000
> > R13: ffffffff82a52af0 R14: 0000000000000200 R15: ffff888100331130
> > ? register_kprobe+0x43c/0x492
> > ? stop_machine_from_inactive_cpu+0x120/0x120
> > ? kprobe_target+0x1/0x16
> > ? init_test_probes+0x2c6/0x38a
> > init_kprobes+0x193/0x19d
> > ? debugfs_kprobe_init+0xb8/0xb8
> > do_one_initcall+0xf9/0x27e
> > ? rcu_read_lock_sched_held+0x3e/0x75
> > ? init_mm_internals+0x27b/0x284
> > kernel_init_freeable+0x16e/0x2b6
> > ? rest_init+0x152/0x152
> > kernel_init+0xe/0x109
> > ret_from_fork+0x22/0x30
> > Kprobe smoke test: passed successfully
> >
> > Config attached.
>
> Thanks for the report! Let me check what happen.

OK, confirmed. But this is actually false-positive report.

The lockdep reports rp->lock case between pre_handler_kretprobe()
and recycle_rp_inst() from __kretprobe_trampoline_handler().
Since kretprobe_trampoline_handler() sets current_kprobe,
if other kprobes hits on same CPU, those are skipped. This means
pre_handler_kretprobe() is not called while executing
__kretprobe_trampoline_handler().

Actually, since this rp->lock is expected to be removed in the last
patch in this series ([21/21]), I left this as is, but we might better
to treat this case because the latter half of this series will be
merged in 5.11.

Hmm, are there any way to tell lockdep this is safe?

Thank you,


Thank you,

--
Masami Hiramatsu <mhiramat@kernel.org>

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2020-11-02 06:54    [W:0.073 / U:2.308 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site