lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Aug]   [21]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 0/3] fix interrupt swamp in NVMe
On Wed, Aug 21, 2019 at 04:27:00PM +0000, Long Li wrote:
> >>>Subject: Re: [PATCH 0/3] fix interrupt swamp in NVMe
> >>>
> >>>On Wed, Aug 21, 2019 at 07:47:44AM +0000, Long Li wrote:
> >>>> >>>Subject: Re: [PATCH 0/3] fix interrupt swamp in NVMe
> >>>> >>>
> >>>> >>>On 20/08/2019 09:25, Ming Lei wrote:
> >>>> >>>> On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 2:14 PM <longli@linuxonhyperv.com> wrote:
> >>>> >>>>>
> >>>> >>>>> From: Long Li <longli@microsoft.com>
> >>>> >>>>>
> >>>> >>>>> This patch set tries to fix interrupt swamp in NVMe devices.
> >>>> >>>>>
> >>>> >>>>> On large systems with many CPUs, a number of CPUs may share
> >>>one
> >>>> >>>NVMe
> >>>> >>>>> hardware queue. It may have this situation where several CPUs
> >>>> >>>>> are issuing I/Os, and all the I/Os are returned on the CPU where
> >>>> >>>>> the
> >>>> >>>hardware queue is bound to.
> >>>> >>>>> This may result in that CPU swamped by interrupts and stay in
> >>>> >>>>> interrupt mode for extended time while other CPUs continue to
> >>>> >>>>> issue I/O. This can trigger Watchdog and RCU timeout, and make
> >>>> >>>>> the system
> >>>> >>>unresponsive.
> >>>> >>>>>
> >>>> >>>>> This patch set addresses this by enforcing scheduling and
> >>>> >>>>> throttling I/O when CPU is starved in this situation.
> >>>> >>>>>
> >>>> >>>>> Long Li (3):
> >>>> >>>>> sched: define a function to report the number of context switches
> >>>on a
> >>>> >>>>> CPU
> >>>> >>>>> sched: export idle_cpu()
> >>>> >>>>> nvme: complete request in work queue on CPU with flooded
> >>>> >>>>> interrupts
> >>>> >>>>>
> >>>> >>>>> drivers/nvme/host/core.c | 57
> >>>> >>>>> +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-
> >>>> >>>>> drivers/nvme/host/nvme.h | 1 +
> >>>> >>>>> include/linux/sched.h | 2 ++
> >>>> >>>>> kernel/sched/core.c | 7 +++++
> >>>> >>>>> 4 files changed, 66 insertions(+), 1 deletion(-)
> >>>> >>>>
> >>>> >>>> Another simpler solution may be to complete request in threaded
> >>>> >>>> interrupt handler for this case. Meantime allow scheduler to run
> >>>> >>>> the interrupt thread handler on CPUs specified by the irq
> >>>> >>>> affinity mask, which was discussed by the following link:
> >>>> >>>>
> >>>> >>>>
> >>>> >>>https://lor
> >>>> >>>e
> >>>> >>>> .kernel.org%2Flkml%2Fe0e9478e-62a5-ca24-3b12-
> >>>> >>>58f7d056383e%40huawei.com
> >>>> >>>> %2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7Clongli%40microsoft.com%7Cc7f46d3e2
> >>>73f45
> >>>> >>>176d1c08
> >>>> >>>>
> >>>> >>>d7254cc69e%7C72f988bf86f141af91ab2d7cd011db47%7C1%7C0%7C63
> >>>70188
> >>>> >>>8401588
> >>>> >>>>
> >>>> >>>9866&amp;sdata=h5k6HoGoyDxuhmDfuKLZUwgmw17PU%2BT%2FCb
> >>>awfxV
> >>>> >>>Er3U%3D&amp;
> >>>> >>>> reserved=0
> >>>> >>>>
> >>>> >>>> Could you try the above solution and see if the lockup can be
> >>>avoided?
> >>>> >>>> John Garry
> >>>> >>>> should have workable patch.
> >>>> >>>
> >>>> >>>Yeah, so we experimented with changing the interrupt handling in
> >>>> >>>the SCSI driver I maintain to use a threaded handler IRQ handler
> >>>> >>>plus patch below, and saw a significant throughput boost:
> >>>> >>>
> >>>> >>>--->8
> >>>> >>>
> >>>> >>>Subject: [PATCH] genirq: Add support to allow thread to use hard
> >>>> >>>irq affinity
> >>>> >>>
> >>>> >>>Currently the cpu allowed mask for the threaded part of a threaded
> >>>> >>>irq handler will be set to the effective affinity of the hard irq.
> >>>> >>>
> >>>> >>>Typically the effective affinity of the hard irq will be for a
> >>>> >>>single cpu. As such, the threaded handler would always run on the
> >>>same cpu as the hard irq.
> >>>> >>>
> >>>> >>>We have seen scenarios in high data-rate throughput testing that
> >>>> >>>the cpu handling the interrupt can be totally saturated handling
> >>>> >>>both the hard interrupt and threaded handler parts, limiting
> >>>throughput.
> >>>> >>>
> >>>> >>>Add IRQF_IRQ_AFFINITY flag to allow the driver requesting the
> >>>> >>>threaded interrupt to decide on the policy of which cpu the threaded
> >>>handler may run.
> >>>> >>>
> >>>> >>>Signed-off-by: John Garry <john.garry@huawei.com>
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks for pointing me to this patch. This fixed the interrupt swamp and
> >>>make the system stable.
> >>>>
> >>>> However I'm seeing reduced performance when using threaded
> >>>interrupts.
> >>>>
> >>>> Here are the test results on a system with 80 CPUs and 10 NVMe disks
> >>>> (32 hardware queues for each disk) Benchmark tool is FIO, I/O pattern:
> >>>> 4k random reads on all NVMe disks, with queue depth = 64, num of jobs
> >>>> = 80, direct=1
> >>>>
> >>>> With threaded interrupts: 1320k IOPS
> >>>> With just interrupts: 3720k IOPS
> >>>> With just interrupts and my patch: 3700k IOPS
> >>>
> >>>This gap looks too big wrt. threaded interrupts vs. interrupts.
> >>>
> >>>>
> >>>> At the peak IOPS, the overall CPU usage is at around 98-99%. I think the
> >>>cost of doing wake up and context switch for NVMe threaded IRQ handler
> >>>takes some CPU away.
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>>In theory, it shouldn't be so because most of times the thread should be
> >>>running on CPUs of this hctx, and the wakeup cost shouldn't be so big.
> >>>Maybe there is performance problem somewhere wrt. threaded interrupt.
> >>>
> >>>Could you share us your test script and environment? I will see if I can
> >>>reproduce it in my environment.
>
> Ming, do you have access to L80s_v2 in Azure? This test needs to run on that VM size.
>
> Here is the command to benchmark it:
>
> fio --bs=4k --ioengine=libaio --iodepth=128 --filename=/dev/nvme0n1:/dev/nvme1n1:/dev/nvme2n1:/dev/nvme3n1:/dev/nvme4n1:/dev/nvme5n1:/dev/nvme6n1:/dev/nvme7n1:/dev/nvme8n1:/dev/nvme9n1 --direct=1 --runtime=120 --numjobs=80 --rw=randread --name=test --group_reporting --gtod_reduce=1
>

I can reproduce the issue on one machine(96 cores) with 4 NVMes(32 queues), so
each queue is served on 3 CPUs.

IOPS drops > 20% when 'use_threaded_interrupts' is enabled. From fio log, CPU
context switch is increased a lot.


Thanks,
Ming

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-08-22 03:34    [W:0.095 / U:33.096 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site