lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [May]   [21]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 1/2] dma-mapping: truncate dma masks to what dma_addr_t can hold
On Tue, May 21, 2019 at 02:04:37PM +0100, Russell King - ARM Linux admin wrote:
> So how does the driver negotiation for >32bit addresses work if we don't
> fail for large masks?
>
> I'm thinking about all those PCI drivers that need DAC cycles for >32bit
> addresses, such as e1000, which negotiate via (eg):
>
> /* there is a workaround being applied below that limits
> * 64-bit DMA addresses to 64-bit hardware. There are some
> * 32-bit adapters that Tx hang when given 64-bit DMA addresses
> */
> pci_using_dac = 0;
> if ((hw->bus_type == e1000_bus_type_pcix) &&
> !dma_set_mask_and_coherent(&pdev->dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
> pci_using_dac = 1;
> } else {
> err = dma_set_mask_and_coherent(&pdev->dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32));
> if (err) {
> pr_err("No usable DMA config, aborting\n");
> goto err_dma;
> }
> }
>
> and similar. If we blindly trunate the 64-bit to 32-bit, aren't we
> going to end up with PCI cards using DAC cycles to a host bridge that
> do not support DAC cycles?

In general PCI devices just use DAC cycles when they need it. I only
know of about a handful of devices that need to negotiate their
addressing mode, and those already use the proper API for that, which
is dma_get_required_mask.

The e1000 example is a good case of how the old API confused people.
First it only sets the 64-bit mask for devices which can support it,
which is good, but then it sets the NETIF_F_HIGHDMA flag only if we
set a 64-bit mask, which is completely unrelated to the DMA mask,
it just means the driver can handle sk_buff fragments that do not
have a kernel mapping, which really is a driver and not a hardware
issue.

So what this driver really should do is something like:


diff --git a/drivers/net/ethernet/intel/e1000/e1000_main.c b/drivers/net/ethernet/intel/e1000/e1000_main.c
index 551de8c2fef2..d9236083da94 100644
--- a/drivers/net/ethernet/intel/e1000/e1000_main.c
+++ b/drivers/net/ethernet/intel/e1000/e1000_main.c
@@ -925,7 +925,7 @@ static int e1000_probe(struct pci_dev *pdev, const struct pci_device_id *ent)

static int cards_found;
static int global_quad_port_a; /* global ksp3 port a indication */
- int i, err, pci_using_dac;
+ int i, err;
u16 eeprom_data = 0;
u16 tmp = 0;
u16 eeprom_apme_mask = E1000_EEPROM_APME;
@@ -996,16 +996,11 @@ static int e1000_probe(struct pci_dev *pdev, const struct pci_device_id *ent)
* 64-bit DMA addresses to 64-bit hardware. There are some
* 32-bit adapters that Tx hang when given 64-bit DMA addresses
*/
- pci_using_dac = 0;
- if ((hw->bus_type == e1000_bus_type_pcix) &&
- !dma_set_mask_and_coherent(&pdev->dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(64))) {
- pci_using_dac = 1;
- } else {
- err = dma_set_mask_and_coherent(&pdev->dev, DMA_BIT_MASK(32));
- if (err) {
- pr_err("No usable DMA config, aborting\n");
- goto err_dma;
- }
+ err = dma_set_mask_and_coherent(&pdev->dev,
+ DMA_BIT_MASK(hw->bus_type == e1000_bus_type_pcix ? 64 : 32));
+ if (err) {
+ pr_err("No usable DMA config, aborting\n");
+ goto err_dma;
}

netdev->netdev_ops = &e1000_netdev_ops;
@@ -1047,19 +1042,15 @@ static int e1000_probe(struct pci_dev *pdev, const struct pci_device_id *ent)

netdev->priv_flags |= IFF_SUPP_NOFCS;

- netdev->features |= netdev->hw_features;
+ netdev->features |= netdev->hw_features | NETIF_F_HIGHDMA;
netdev->hw_features |= (NETIF_F_RXCSUM |
NETIF_F_RXALL |
NETIF_F_RXFCS);

- if (pci_using_dac) {
- netdev->features |= NETIF_F_HIGHDMA;
- netdev->vlan_features |= NETIF_F_HIGHDMA;
- }
-
netdev->vlan_features |= (NETIF_F_TSO |
NETIF_F_HW_CSUM |
- NETIF_F_SG);
+ NETIF_F_SG |
+ NETIF_F_HIGHDMA);

/* Do not set IFF_UNICAST_FLT for VMWare's 82545EM */
if (hw->device_id != E1000_DEV_ID_82545EM_COPPER ||
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-05-21 15:17    [W:0.115 / U:28.032 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site