lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Apr]   [4]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH] Convert struct pid count to refcount_t
On Thu, Apr 04, 2019 at 02:08:42PM -0400, Joel Fernandes wrote:
> Thanks a lot Paul and Allen, I replied below.
>
> On Thu, Apr 04, 2019 at 12:01:32PM -0400, Alan Stern wrote:
> > On Thu, 4 Apr 2019, Paul E. McKenney wrote:
> >
> > > On Mon, Apr 01, 2019 at 05:11:39PM -0400, Joel Fernandes wrote:
> >
> > > > > > So I would have expected the following litmus to result in Never, but it
> > > > > > doesn't with Alan's patch:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > P0(int *x, int *y)
> > > > > > {
> > > > > > *x = 1;
> > > > > > smp_mb();
> > > > > > *y = 1;
> > > > > > }
> > > > > >
> > > > > > P1(int *x, int *y)
> > > > > > {
> > > > > > int r1;
> > > > > >
> > > > > > r1 = READ_ONCE(*y);
> > > > > > if (r1)
> > > > > > WRITE_ONCE(*x, 2);
> > > > > > }
> > > > > >
> > > > > > exists (1:r1=1 /\ ~x=2)
> > > > >
> > > > > The problem is that the compiler can turn both of P0()'s writes into reads:
> > > > >
> > > > > P0(int *x, int *y)
> > > > > {
> > > > > if (*x != 1)
> > > > > *x = 1;
> > > > > smp_mb();
> > > > > if (*y != 1)
> > > > > *y = 1;
> > > > > }
> > > > >
> > > > > These reads will not be ordered by smp_wmb(), so you have to do WRITE_ONCE()
> > > > > to get an iron-clad ordering guarantee.
> > > >
> > > > But the snippet above has smp_mb() which does order writes, even for the
> > > > plain accesses.
> > >
> > > True, but that code has a data race, namely P0()'s plain write to y
> > > races with P1()'s READ_ONCE(). Data races give the compiler absolutely
> > > astonishing levels of freedom to rearrange your code. So, if you
> > > as a developer or maintainer choose to have data races, it is your
> > > responsibility to ensure that the compiler cannot mess you up. So what
> > > you should do in that case is to list the transformed code the compiler's
> > > optimizations can produce and feed the corresponding litmus tests to LKMM,
> > > using READ_ONCE() and WRITE_ONCE() for the post-optimization accesses.
> >
> > In this case, I strongly suspect the compiler would not mess up the
> > code badly enough to allow the unwanted end result. But the LKMM tries
> > to avoid making strong assumptions about what compilers will or will
> > not do.
>
> Here I was just trying to understand better how any kind of code
> transformation can cause an issue. Certainly I can see an issue if the
> compiler uses the memory location as a temporary variable as Paul pointed, to
> which I agree that a WRITE_ONCE is better. I am in favor of being careful,
> but here I was just trying to understand this better.
>
> > > > I understand. Are we talking about load/store tearing being the issue here?
> > > > Even under load/store tearing, I feel the program will produce correct
> > > > results because r1 is either 0 or 1 (a single bit cannot be torn).
> > >
> > > The compiler can (at least in theory) also transform *y = 1 as follows:
> > >
> > > *y = r1; /* Use *y as temporary storage. */
> > > do_something();
> > > r1 = *y;
> > > *y = 1;
> > >
> > > Here r1 is some register and do_something() is an inline function visible
> > > to the compiler (hence not implying barrier() upon call and return).
> > >
> > > I don't know of any compilers that actually do this, but for me use
> > > of WRITE_ONCE() is a small price to pay to prevent all past, present,
> > > and future compiler from ever destroying^W optimizing my code in this way.
> > >
> > > In your own code, if you dislike WRITE_ONCE() so much that you are willing
> > > to commit to (now and forever!!!) checking all applicable versions of
> > > compilers to make sure that they don't do this, well and good, knock
> > > yourself out. But it is your responsibility to do that checking, and you
> > > can attest to LKMM that you have done so by giving LKMM litmus tests that
> > > substitute WRITE_ONCE() for that plain C-language assignment statement.
> >
> > Remember that the LKMM does not produce strict bounds. That is, the
> > LKMM will say that some outcomes are allowed even though no existing
> > compiler/CPU combination would ever actually produce them. This litmus
> > test is an example.
>
> Ok.
>
> > > > Further, from the herd simulator output (below), according to the "States",
> > > > r1==1 means P1() AFAICS would have already finished the the read and set the
> > > > r1 register to 1. Then I am wondering why it couldn't take the branch to set
> > > > *x to 2. According to herd, r1 == 1 AND x == 1 is a perfectly valid state
> > > > for the below program. I still couldn't see in my mind how for the below
> > > > program, this is possible - in terms of compiler optimizations or other kinds
> > > > of ordering. Because there is a smp_mb() between the 2 plain writes in P0()
> > > > and P1() did establish that r1 is 1 in the positive case. :-/. I am surely
> > > > missing something :-)
> > > >
> > > > ---8<-----------------------
> > > > C Joel-put_pid
> > > >
> > > > {}
> > > >
> > > > P0(int *x, int *y)
> > > > {
> > > > *x = 1;
> > > > smp_mb();
> > > > *y = 1;
> > > > }
> > > >
> > > > P1(int *x, int *y)
> > > > {
> > > > int r1;
> > > >
> > > > r1 = READ_ONCE(*y);
> > > > if (r1)
> > > > WRITE_ONCE(*x, 2);
> > > > }
> > > >
> > > > exists (1:r1=1 /\ ~x=2)
> > > >
> > > > ---8<-----------------------
> > > > Output:
> > > >
> > > > Test Joel-put_pid Allowed
> > > > States 3
> > > > 1:r1=0; x=1;
> > > > 1:r1=1; x=1; <-- Can't figure out why r1=1 and x != 2 here.
> > >
> > > I must defer to Alan on this, but my guess is that this is due to
> > > the fact that there is a data race.
> >
> > Yes, and because the plain-access/data-race patch for the LKMM was
> > intended only to detect data races, not to be aware of all the kinds of
> > ordering that plain accesses can induce. I said as much at the start
> > of the patch's cover letter and it bears repeating.
> >
> > In this case it is certainly true that the "*x = 1" write must be
> > complete before the value of *y is changed from 0. Hence P1's
> > WRITE_ONCE will certainly overwrite the 1 with 2, and the final value
> > of *x will be 2 if r1=1.
> >
> > But the notion of "visibility" of a write that I put into the LKMM
> > patch only allows for chains of marked accesses. Since "*y = 1" is a
> > plain access, the model does not recognize that it can enforce the
> > ordering between the two writes to *x.
> >
> > Also, you must remember, the LKMM's prediction about whether an outcome
> > will or will not occur are meaningless if a data race is present.
> > Therefore the most fundamental the answer to why the "1:r1=1; x=1;"
> > line is there is basically what Paul said: It's there because the
> > herd model gets completely messed up by data races.
>
> Makes sense to me. Thanks for the good work on this.
>
> FWIW, thought to mention (feel free ignore the suggestion if its
> meaningless): If there is any chance that the outcome can be better
> outputted, like r1=X; x=1; Where X stands for the result of a data race, that
> would be lovely. I don't know much about herd internals (yet) to say if the
> suggestion makes sense but as a user, it would certainly help reduce
> confusion.

The "Flag data-race" that appeared in the herd output is your friend in
this case. If you see that in the output, that means that herd detected
a data race, and the states output might or might not be reliable.

Thanx, Paul

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-04-04 20:22    [W:0.079 / U:57.620 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site