lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Mar]   [8]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 0/5] x86/percpu semantics and fixes
Date
> On Mar 8, 2019, at 6:50 AM, Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> wrote:
>
> On Wed, Feb 27, 2019 at 11:12:52AM +0100, Peter Zijlstra wrote:
>
>> This is a collection of x86/percpu changes that I had pending and got reminded
>> of by Linus' comment yesterday about __this_cpu_xchg().
>>
>> This tidies up the x86/percpu primitives and fixes a bunch of 'fallout'.
>
> (Sorry; this is going to have _wide_ output)
>
> OK, so what I did is I build 4 kernels (O=defconfig-build{,1,2,3}) with
> resp that many patches of this series applied.
>
> When I look at just the vmlinux size output:
>
> $ size defconfig-build*/vmlinux
> text data bss dec hex filename
> 19540631 5040164 1871944 26452739 193a303 defconfig-build/vmlinux
> 19540635 5040164 1871944 26452743 193a307 defconfig-build1/vmlinux
> 19540685 5040164 1871944 26452793 193a339 defconfig-build2/vmlinux
> 19540685 5040164 1871944 26452793 193a339 defconfig-build3/vmlinux
>
> Things appear to get slightly larger; however when I look in more
> detail using my (newly written compare script, find attached), I get
> things like:

Nice script! I keep asking myself how comparing two binaries can provide
some “number” to indicate how “good” the binary is (at least relatively to
another one) - either during compilation or after. Code size, as you show,
is the wrong metric.

Anyhow, I am a little disappointed (and surprised) that in most cases that I
played with, this kind of optimizations have marginal impact on performance
at best, even when the binary changes “a lot” and when microbenchmarks are
used.

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-03-08 20:37    [W:0.160 / U:13.604 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site