lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Mar]   [6]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
From
Subject[PATCH] arch: um: drivers: Kconfig: formatting cleanup
Date
Signed-off-by: Enrico Weigelt, metux IT consult <info@metux.net>
---
arch/um/drivers/Kconfig | 352 ++++++++++++++++++++++++------------------------
1 file changed, 176 insertions(+), 176 deletions(-)

diff --git a/arch/um/drivers/Kconfig b/arch/um/drivers/Kconfig
index 2b1aaf7..2638e46 100644
--- a/arch/um/drivers/Kconfig
+++ b/arch/um/drivers/Kconfig
@@ -11,58 +11,58 @@ config STDERR_CONSOLE
config SSL
bool "Virtual serial line"
help
- The User-Mode Linux environment allows you to create virtual serial
- lines on the UML that are usually made to show up on the host as
- ttys or ptys.
+ The User-Mode Linux environment allows you to create virtual serial
+ lines on the UML that are usually made to show up on the host as
+ ttys or ptys.

- See <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/input.html> for more
- information and command line examples of how to use this facility.
+ See <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/input.html> for more
+ information and command line examples of how to use this facility.

- Unless you have a specific reason for disabling this, say Y.
+ Unless you have a specific reason for disabling this, say Y.

config NULL_CHAN
bool "null channel support"
help
- This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
- lines to a device similar to /dev/null. Data written to it disappears
- and there is never any data to be read.
+ This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
+ lines to a device similar to /dev/null. Data written to it disappears
+ and there is never any data to be read.

config PORT_CHAN
bool "port channel support"
help
- This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
- lines to host portals. They may be accessed with 'telnet <host>
- <port number>'. Any number of consoles and serial lines may be
- attached to a single portal, although what UML device you get when
- you telnet to that portal will be unpredictable.
- It is safe to say 'Y' here.
+ This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
+ lines to host portals. They may be accessed with 'telnet <host>
+ <port number>'. Any number of consoles and serial lines may be
+ attached to a single portal, although what UML device you get when
+ you telnet to that portal will be unpredictable.
+ It is safe to say 'Y' here.

config PTY_CHAN
bool "pty channel support"
help
- This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
- lines to host pseudo-terminals. Access to both traditional
- pseudo-terminals (/dev/pty*) and pts pseudo-terminals are controlled
- with this option. The assignment of UML devices to host devices
- will be announced in the kernel message log.
- It is safe to say 'Y' here.
+ This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
+ lines to host pseudo-terminals. Access to both traditional
+ pseudo-terminals (/dev/pty*) and pts pseudo-terminals are controlled
+ with this option. The assignment of UML devices to host devices
+ will be announced in the kernel message log.
+ It is safe to say 'Y' here.

config TTY_CHAN
bool "tty channel support"
help
- This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
- lines to host terminals. Access to both virtual consoles
- (/dev/tty*) and the slave side of pseudo-terminals (/dev/ttyp* and
- /dev/pts/*) are controlled by this option.
- It is safe to say 'Y' here.
+ This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
+ lines to host terminals. Access to both virtual consoles
+ (/dev/tty*) and the slave side of pseudo-terminals (/dev/ttyp* and
+ /dev/pts/*) are controlled by this option.
+ It is safe to say 'Y' here.

config XTERM_CHAN
bool "xterm channel support"
help
- This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
- lines to xterms. Each UML device so assigned will be brought up in
- its own xterm.
- It is safe to say 'Y' here.
+ This option enables support for attaching UML consoles and serial
+ lines to xterms. Each UML device so assigned will be brought up in
+ its own xterm.
+ It is safe to say 'Y' here.

config NOCONFIG_CHAN
bool
@@ -72,43 +72,43 @@ config CON_ZERO_CHAN
string "Default main console channel initialization"
default "fd:0,fd:1"
help
- This is the string describing the channel to which the main console
- will be attached by default. This value can be overridden from the
- command line. The default value is "fd:0,fd:1", which attaches the
- main console to stdin and stdout.
- It is safe to leave this unchanged.
+ This is the string describing the channel to which the main console
+ will be attached by default. This value can be overridden from the
+ command line. The default value is "fd:0,fd:1", which attaches the
+ main console to stdin and stdout.
+ It is safe to leave this unchanged.

config CON_CHAN
string "Default console channel initialization"
default "xterm"
help
- This is the string describing the channel to which all consoles
- except the main console will be attached by default. This value can
- be overridden from the command line. The default value is "xterm",
- which brings them up in xterms.
- It is safe to leave this unchanged, although you may wish to change
- this if you expect the UML that you build to be run in environments
- which don't have X or xterm available.
+ This is the string describing the channel to which all consoles
+ except the main console will be attached by default. This value can
+ be overridden from the command line. The default value is "xterm",
+ which brings them up in xterms.
+ It is safe to leave this unchanged, although you may wish to change
+ this if you expect the UML that you build to be run in environments
+ which don't have X or xterm available.

config SSL_CHAN
string "Default serial line channel initialization"
default "pty"
help
- This is the string describing the channel to which the serial lines
- will be attached by default. This value can be overridden from the
- command line. The default value is "pty", which attaches them to
- traditional pseudo-terminals.
- It is safe to leave this unchanged, although you may wish to change
- this if you expect the UML that you build to be run in environments
- which don't have a set of /dev/pty* devices.
+ This is the string describing the channel to which the serial lines
+ will be attached by default. This value can be overridden from the
+ command line. The default value is "pty", which attaches them to
+ traditional pseudo-terminals.
+ It is safe to leave this unchanged, although you may wish to change
+ this if you expect the UML that you build to be run in environments
+ which don't have a set of /dev/pty* devices.

config UML_SOUND
tristate "Sound support"
help
- This option enables UML sound support. If enabled, it will pull in
- soundcore and the UML hostaudio relay, which acts as a intermediary
- between the host's dsp and mixer devices and the UML sound system.
- It is safe to say 'Y' here.
+ This option enables UML sound support. If enabled, it will pull in
+ soundcore and the UML hostaudio relay, which acts as a intermediary
+ between the host's dsp and mixer devices and the UML sound system.
+ It is safe to say 'Y' here.

config SOUND
tristate
@@ -131,107 +131,107 @@ menu "UML Network Devices"
config UML_NET
bool "Virtual network device"
help
- While the User-Mode port cannot directly talk to any physical
- hardware devices, this choice and the following transport options
- provide one or more virtual network devices through which the UML
- kernels can talk to each other, the host, and with the host's help,
- machines on the outside world.
+ While the User-Mode port cannot directly talk to any physical
+ hardware devices, this choice and the following transport options
+ provide one or more virtual network devices through which the UML
+ kernels can talk to each other, the host, and with the host's help,
+ machines on the outside world.

- For more information, including explanations of the networking and
- sample configurations, see
- <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html>.
+ For more information, including explanations of the networking and
+ sample configurations, see
+ <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html>.

- If you'd like to be able to enable networking in the User-Mode
- linux environment, say Y; otherwise say N. Note that you must
- enable at least one of the following transport options to actually
- make use of UML networking.
+ If you'd like to be able to enable networking in the User-Mode
+ linux environment, say Y; otherwise say N. Note that you must
+ enable at least one of the following transport options to actually
+ make use of UML networking.

config UML_NET_ETHERTAP
bool "Ethertap transport"
depends on UML_NET
help
- The Ethertap User-Mode Linux network transport allows a single
- running UML to exchange packets with its host over one of the
- host's Ethertap devices, such as /dev/tap0. Additional running
- UMLs can use additional Ethertap devices, one per running UML.
- While the UML believes it's on a (multi-device, broadcast) virtual
- Ethernet network, it's in fact communicating over a point-to-point
- link with the host.
-
- To use this, your host kernel must have support for Ethertap
- devices. Also, if your host kernel is 2.4.x, it must have
- CONFIG_NETLINK_DEV configured as Y or M.
-
- For more information, see
- <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html> That site
- has examples of the UML command line to use to enable Ethertap
- networking.
-
- If you'd like to set up an IP network with the host and/or the
- outside world, say Y to this, the Daemon Transport and/or the
- Slip Transport. You'll need at least one of them, but may choose
- more than one without conflict. If you don't need UML networking,
- say N.
+ The Ethertap User-Mode Linux network transport allows a single
+ running UML to exchange packets with its host over one of the
+ host's Ethertap devices, such as /dev/tap0. Additional running
+ UMLs can use additional Ethertap devices, one per running UML.
+ While the UML believes it's on a (multi-device, broadcast) virtual
+ Ethernet network, it's in fact communicating over a point-to-point
+ link with the host.
+
+ To use this, your host kernel must have support for Ethertap
+ devices. Also, if your host kernel is 2.4.x, it must have
+ CONFIG_NETLINK_DEV configured as Y or M.
+
+ For more information, see
+ <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html> That site
+ has examples of the UML command line to use to enable Ethertap
+ networking.
+
+ If you'd like to set up an IP network with the host and/or the
+ outside world, say Y to this, the Daemon Transport and/or the
+ Slip Transport. You'll need at least one of them, but may choose
+ more than one without conflict. If you don't need UML networking,
+ say N.

config UML_NET_TUNTAP
bool "TUN/TAP transport"
depends on UML_NET
help
- The UML TUN/TAP network transport allows a UML instance to exchange
- packets with the host over a TUN/TAP device. This option will only
- work with a 2.4 host, unless you've applied the TUN/TAP patch to
- your 2.2 host kernel.
+ The UML TUN/TAP network transport allows a UML instance to exchange
+ packets with the host over a TUN/TAP device. This option will only
+ work with a 2.4 host, unless you've applied the TUN/TAP patch to
+ your 2.2 host kernel.

- To use this transport, your host kernel must have support for TUN/TAP
- devices, either built-in or as a module.
+ To use this transport, your host kernel must have support for TUN/TAP
+ devices, either built-in or as a module.

config UML_NET_SLIP
bool "SLIP transport"
depends on UML_NET
help
- The slip User-Mode Linux network transport allows a running UML to
- network with its host over a point-to-point link. Unlike Ethertap,
- which can carry any Ethernet frame (and hence even non-IP packets),
- the slip transport can only carry IP packets.
-
- To use this, your host must support slip devices.
-
- For more information, see
- <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html>.
- has examples of the UML command line to use to enable slip
- networking, and details of a few quirks with it.
-
- The Ethertap Transport is preferred over slip because of its
- limitations. If you prefer slip, however, say Y here. Otherwise
- choose the Multicast transport (to network multiple UMLs on
- multiple hosts), Ethertap (to network with the host and the
- outside world), and/or the Daemon transport (to network multiple
- UMLs on a single host). You may choose more than one without
- conflict. If you don't need UML networking, say N.
+ The slip User-Mode Linux network transport allows a running UML to
+ network with its host over a point-to-point link. Unlike Ethertap,
+ which can carry any Ethernet frame (and hence even non-IP packets),
+ the slip transport can only carry IP packets.
+
+ To use this, your host must support slip devices.
+
+ For more information, see
+ <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html>.
+ has examples of the UML command line to use to enable slip
+ networking, and details of a few quirks with it.
+
+ The Ethertap Transport is preferred over slip because of its
+ limitations. If you prefer slip, however, say Y here. Otherwise
+ choose the Multicast transport (to network multiple UMLs on
+ multiple hosts), Ethertap (to network with the host and the
+ outside world), and/or the Daemon transport (to network multiple
+ UMLs on a single host). You may choose more than one without
+ conflict. If you don't need UML networking, say N.

config UML_NET_DAEMON
bool "Daemon transport"
depends on UML_NET
help
- This User-Mode Linux network transport allows one or more running
- UMLs on a single host to communicate with each other, but not to
- the host.
-
- To use this form of networking, you'll need to run the UML
- networking daemon on the host.
-
- For more information, see
- <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html> That site
- has examples of the UML command line to use to enable Daemon
- networking.
-
- If you'd like to set up a network with other UMLs on a single host,
- say Y. If you need a network between UMLs on multiple physical
- hosts, choose the Multicast Transport. To set up a network with
- the host and/or other IP machines, say Y to the Ethertap or Slip
- transports. You'll need at least one of them, but may choose
- more than one without conflict. If you don't need UML networking,
- say N.
+ This User-Mode Linux network transport allows one or more running
+ UMLs on a single host to communicate with each other, but not to
+ the host.
+
+ To use this form of networking, you'll need to run the UML
+ networking daemon on the host.
+
+ For more information, see
+ <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html> That site
+ has examples of the UML command line to use to enable Daemon
+ networking.
+
+ If you'd like to set up a network with other UMLs on a single host,
+ say Y. If you need a network between UMLs on multiple physical
+ hosts, choose the Multicast Transport. To set up a network with
+ the host and/or other IP machines, say Y to the Ethertap or Slip
+ transports. You'll need at least one of them, but may choose
+ more than one without conflict. If you don't need UML networking,
+ say N.

config UML_NET_VECTOR
bool "Vector I/O high performance network devices"
@@ -270,26 +270,26 @@ config UML_NET_MCAST
bool "Multicast transport"
depends on UML_NET
help
- This Multicast User-Mode Linux network transport allows multiple
- UMLs (even ones running on different host machines!) to talk to
- each other over a virtual ethernet network. However, it requires
- at least one UML with one of the other transports to act as a
- bridge if any of them need to be able to talk to their hosts or any
- other IP machines.
-
- To use this, your host kernel(s) must support IP Multicasting.
-
- For more information, see
- <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html> That site
- has examples of the UML command line to use to enable Multicast
- networking, and notes about the security of this approach.
-
- If you need UMLs on multiple physical hosts to communicate as if
- they shared an Ethernet network, say Y. If you need to communicate
- with other IP machines, make sure you select one of the other
- transports (possibly in addition to Multicast; they're not
- exclusive). If you don't need to network UMLs say N to each of
- the transports.
+ This Multicast User-Mode Linux network transport allows multiple
+ UMLs (even ones running on different host machines!) to talk to
+ each other over a virtual ethernet network. However, it requires
+ at least one UML with one of the other transports to act as a
+ bridge if any of them need to be able to talk to their hosts or any
+ other IP machines.
+
+ To use this, your host kernel(s) must support IP Multicasting.
+
+ For more information, see
+ <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html> That site
+ has examples of the UML command line to use to enable Multicast
+ networking, and notes about the security of this approach.
+
+ If you need UMLs on multiple physical hosts to communicate as if
+ they shared an Ethernet network, say Y. If you need to communicate
+ with other IP machines, make sure you select one of the other
+ transports (possibly in addition to Multicast; they're not
+ exclusive). If you don't need to network UMLs say N to each of
+ the transports.

config UML_NET_PCAP
bool "pcap transport"
@@ -300,9 +300,9 @@ config UML_NET_PCAP
UML act as a network monitor for the host. You must have libcap
installed in order to build the pcap transport into UML.

- For more information, see
- <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html> That site
- has examples of the UML command line to use to enable this option.
+ For more information, see
+ <http://user-mode-linux.sourceforge.net/old/networking.html> That site
+ has examples of the UML command line to use to enable this option.

If you intend to use UML as a network monitor for the host, say
Y here. Otherwise, say N.
@@ -311,27 +311,27 @@ config UML_NET_SLIRP
bool "SLiRP transport"
depends on UML_NET
help
- The SLiRP User-Mode Linux network transport allows a running UML
- to network by invoking a program that can handle SLIP encapsulated
- packets. This is commonly (but not limited to) the application
- known as SLiRP, a program that can re-socket IP packets back onto
- the host on which it is run. Only IP packets are supported,
- unlike other network transports that can handle all Ethernet
- frames. In general, slirp allows the UML the same IP connectivity
- to the outside world that the host user is permitted, and unlike
- other transports, SLiRP works without the need of root level
- privleges, setuid binaries, or SLIP devices on the host. This
- also means not every type of connection is possible, but most
- situations can be accommodated with carefully crafted slirp
- commands that can be passed along as part of the network device's
- setup string. The effect of this transport on the UML is similar
- that of a host behind a firewall that masquerades all network
- connections passing through it (but is less secure).
-
- To use this you should first have slirp compiled somewhere
- accessible on the host, and have read its documentation. If you
- don't need UML networking, say N.
-
- Startup example: "eth0=slirp,FE:FD:01:02:03:04,/usr/local/bin/slirp"
+ The SLiRP User-Mode Linux network transport allows a running UML
+ to network by invoking a program that can handle SLIP encapsulated
+ packets. This is commonly (but not limited to) the application
+ known as SLiRP, a program that can re-socket IP packets back onto
+ he host on which it is run. Only IP packets are supported,
+ unlike other network transports that can handle all Ethernet
+ frames. In general, slirp allows the UML the same IP connectivity
+ to the outside world that the host user is permitted, and unlike
+ other transports, SLiRP works without the need of root level
+ privleges, setuid binaries, or SLIP devices on the host. This
+ also means not every type of connection is possible, but most
+ situations can be accommodated with carefully crafted slirp
+ commands that can be passed along as part of the network device's
+ setup string. The effect of this transport on the UML is similar
+ that of a host behind a firewall that masquerades all network
+ connections passing through it (but is less secure).
+
+ To use this you should first have slirp compiled somewhere
+ accessible on the host, and have read its documentation. If you
+ don't need UML networking, say N.
+
+ Startup example: "eth0=slirp,FE:FD:01:02:03:04,/usr/local/bin/slirp"

endmenu
--
1.9.1
\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-03-06 19:34    [W:0.078 / U:3.152 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site