lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Mar]   [27]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 1/2] dt-bindings: thermal: thermal_mmio: Add binding documentation
On Sun, Mar 03, 2019 at 10:49:25AM +0200, Talel Shenhar wrote:
> Add thermal binding documentation for thermal MMIO driver.
>
> Signed-off-by: Talel Shenhar <talel@amazon.com>
> ---
> .../devicetree/bindings/thermal/thermal_mmio.txt | 173 +++++++++++++++++++++
> 1 file changed, 173 insertions(+)
> create mode 100644 Documentation/devicetree/bindings/thermal/thermal_mmio.txt
>
> diff --git a/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/thermal/thermal_mmio.txt b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/thermal/thermal_mmio.txt
> new file mode 100644
> index 0000000..1f4d738
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/Documentation/devicetree/bindings/thermal/thermal_mmio.txt
> @@ -0,0 +1,173 @@
> +Generic Thermal MMIO Driver

Bindings aren't for drivers.

Do h/w specific bindings and map those to a generic driver if you like.
We simply don't do single register level bindings because that doesn't
scale and things never turn out to be so generic.

> +
> +The generic thermal driver enables easy connectivity between "simple"
> +thermal HW devices to the thermal subsystem. "simple" - thermal HW that
> +doesn't need any configuration (such as power reset or clock enable) by a
> +driver and only exports the temperature via simple MMIO access, or,
> +alternatively, all the configuration is done by other entity (e.g.
> +bootloader).
> +
> +Any system that allows temperature reading via a single memory map read, be
> +it register or shared memory, is a potential candidate to work with this
> +driver.
> +This driver allows manipulations on the read value in order to allow some
> +flexibility for the various thermal HW, e.g. sensor-factor which will be
> +multiplied by the read value.
> +
> +This driver is most suitable for cases such as the following:
> +- The entire thermal HW setup (e.g. configure the thermal HW to work in
> + continuous mode) is done by another SW entity (e.g. bootloader) and all
> + that is left is to read the current temperature from a register
> +- The thermal reading is done by an external CPU (e.g. micro-controller)
> + and that CPU is exporting the reading via a shared memory
> +- The thermal HW setup and reading is done via CPLD, which exports the
> + current temperature to the system via a register
> +- The thermal HW is working out-of-the-box and only reports temperature via
> + a single register access
> +
> +Some examples for cases that this driver is not suitable for:
> +- Your HW need clock enabling to be done by thermal driver

...or avoiding disabling of a clock, regulator, etc.

> +- Your HW need some registers configurations in order to start reporting
> + temperatures and it is not doable by other entities (e.g. bootloader)
> +- Your HW allows reading of temperatures only between ADCs (or any other
> + timing constrains)
> +- In case your HW was configured by a bootloader and it lose the
> + configuration as part of low-power-state and need to be reconfigured.
> + (bootloader configuration typically is not sustained across low power
> + states)
> +- In case the reading from the MMIO require any type of locking

Or filtering/averaging of values.

> +
> +So the only operation this driver will do is MMIO read for the temperature.
> +In case you are using HW that require some configurations this driver is
> +not suitable (you can decide to move all the configuration logic into your
> +bootloader and only leave the temperature reading to this driver but this
> +is up to you).
> +
> +An example of a system that uses this driver is the Amazon Nitro SoC in
> +which there is the main CPU and micro-controller:
> +(1) The micro-controller accesses an SBUS controller to read the thermal
> + sensor from an SBUS slave called Avago Technologies digital
> + Temperature/Voltage Sensor (ip16_SENS_thermvolt25_0)
> +(2) Once the micro-controller gathers the temperature it relays it to the
> + main CPU via a Shared Integrated RAM which is MMIO accessible by the CPU
> +(3) The thermal_mmio driver that runs on the main CPU will read the
> + temperature via an MMIO access to the Shared RAM
> +
> ++------------------+ +----------------+
> +| | (3) | |
> +| Main CPU +----->+ Integrated RAM |
> +| | | |
> ++------------------+ +---------^------+
> + |(2)
> ++-----------------+ +------------------+
> +| | (1) | |
> +| SBUS controller <-------+ micro-controller |
> +| | | |
> ++--------+--------+ +------------------+
> + |
> ++--------v---------------------+
> +| |
> +| Avago Technologies digital |
> +| Temperature/Voltage Sensor |
> +| (ip16_SENS_thermvolt25_0) |
> +| |
> ++------------------------------+

Very specific information for a 'generic' binding.

> +
> +Required properties:
> +- compatible: "thermal-mmio".
> +- reg: The physical base address and length of the sensor's registers.
> +- #thermal-sensor-cells: Must be 1. See ./thermal.txt for a description.
> +
> +Optional properties:> +- sensor-width: Width (in bytes) of each consecutive sensor.
> + Supported: 1, 2, 4.
> + (Default = 4)
> +- sensor-mask: Mask to be applied on the raw read value before any
> + calculation.
> + (Default = 0xFFFFFFFF)
> +- sensor-factor: Scale value by which to multiple the masked read value
> + This is a signed 32 bit value.
> + (Default = 1)
> +- sensor-bias: Bias value to be added to the scaled value.
> + This is a signed 32 bit value.
> + (Default = 0)
> +- sensor-divider: Dividing value by which to divide the calculated value.
> + Diving will be Integer Division.
> + This is a unsigned 32 bit value.
> + (Default = 1)

If you are going to abstract all the h/w access, then get rid of all of
this and just put Celsius values into the "register".

> +
> +Conversion formula from HW MMIO read value to millidegrees (Celsius):
> +T_millidegrees = (bias + (T_raw & mask)*factor)/divider
> +
> +Example 1, two thermal devices with one thermal sensor each, that uses only
> +the required properties (uses default):
> +
> + thermal_d1: thermal_d1 {
> + compatible = "thermal-mmio";
> + reg = <0x0 0x05002860 0x0 0x4>;
> + #thermal-sensor-cells = <0x1>;
> + };
> +
> + thermal_d2: thermal_d2 {
> + compatible = "thermal-mmio";
> + reg = <0x0 0x05000730 0x0 0x4>;
> + #thermal-sensor-cells = <0x1>;
> + };
> +
> + thermal-zones {
> + thermal_d1_z0 {
> + polling-delay-passive = <250>;
> + polling-delay = <1000>;
> + thermal-sensors = <&thermal_d1 0>;
> + trips {
> + thermal_d1_z0_crit {
> + temperature = <105000>;
> + hysteresis = <2000>;
> + type = "critical";
> + };
> + };
> +
> + };
> +
> + thermal_d2_z0 {
> + polling-delay-passive = <250>;
> + polling-delay = <1000>;
> + thermal-sensors = <&thermal_d2 0>;
> + trips {
> + thermal_d2_z0_crit {
> + temperature = <105000>;
> + hysteresis = <2000>;
> + type = "critical";
> + };
> + };
> + };
> + };
> +
> +Example 2, one thermal device with two sensors of 6 bits each each, that
> +has a factor of -5, bias of 23 and dividing of 2:
> +
> + thermal_d3: thermal_d3 {
> + compatible = "thermal-mmio";
> + reg = <0x0 0x05005700 0x0 0x2>;
> + #thermal-sensor-cells = <0x1>;
> + sensor-width = <1>;
> + sensor-mask = <0x3F>;
> + sensor-factor = <(-5)>;
> + sensor-bias = <23>;
> + sensor-divider = <2>;
> + };
> +
> + thermal-zones {
> + thermal_d3 {
> + polling-delay-passive = <250>;
> + polling-delay = <1000>;
> + thermal-sensors = <&thermal_d3 0>;
> + trips {
> + thermal_d3_z0_crit {
> + temperature = <105000>;
> + hysteresis = <2000>;
> + type = "critical";
> + };
> + };
> + };
> + };
> --
> 2.7.4
>

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-03-27 21:01    [W:0.077 / U:8.564 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site