lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Mar]   [21]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [RFC PATCH RESEND 3/3] mm: Add write-protect and clean utilities for address space ranges
On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 08:29:31PM +0000, Thomas Hellstrom wrote:
> On Thu, 2019-03-21 at 10:12 -0400, Jerome Glisse wrote:
> > On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 01:22:41PM +0000, Thomas Hellstrom wrote:
> > > Add two utilities to a) write-protect and b) clean all ptes
> > > pointing into
> > > a range of an address space
> > > The utilities are intended to aid in tracking dirty pages (either
> > > driver-allocated system memory or pci device memory).
> > > The write-protect utility should be used in conjunction with
> > > page_mkwrite() and pfn_mkwrite() to trigger write page-faults on
> > > page
> > > accesses. Typically one would want to use this on sparse accesses
> > > into
> > > large memory regions. The clean utility should be used to utilize
> > > hardware dirtying functionality and avoid the overhead of page-
> > > faults,
> > > typically on large accesses into small memory regions.
> >
> > Again this does not use mmu notifier and there is no scary comment to
> > explain the very limited use case it should be use for ie mmap of a
> > device file and only by the device driver.
>
> Scary comment and asserts will be added.
>
> >
> > Using it ouside of this would break softdirty or trigger false COW or
> > other scary thing.
>
> This is something that should clearly be avoided if at all possible.
> False COWs could be avoided by asserting that VMAs are shared. I need
> to look deaper into softdirty, but note that the __mkwrite / dirty /
> clean pattern is already used in a very similar way in
> drivers/video/fb_defio.c although it operates only on real pages one at
> a time.

It should just be allow only for mapping of device file for which none
of the above apply (softdirty, COW, ...).

>
> >
> > > Cc: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org>
> > > Cc: Matthew Wilcox <willy@infradead.org>
> > > Cc: Will Deacon <will.deacon@arm.com>
> > > Cc: Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org>
> > > Cc: Rik van Riel <riel@surriel.com>
> > > Cc: Minchan Kim <minchan@kernel.org>
> > > Cc: Michal Hocko <mhocko@suse.com>
> > > Cc: Huang Ying <ying.huang@intel.com>
> > > Cc: Souptick Joarder <jrdr.linux@gmail.com>
> > > Cc: "Jérôme Glisse" <jglisse@redhat.com>
> > > Cc: linux-mm@kvack.org
> > > Cc: linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org
> > > Signed-off-by: Thomas Hellstrom <thellstrom@vmware.com>
> > > ---
> > > include/linux/mm.h | 9 +-
> > > mm/Makefile | 2 +-
> > > mm/apply_as_range.c | 257
> > > ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
> > > 3 files changed, 266 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)
> > > create mode 100644 mm/apply_as_range.c
> > >
> > > diff --git a/include/linux/mm.h b/include/linux/mm.h
> > > index b7dd4ddd6efb..62f24dd0bfa0 100644
> > > --- a/include/linux/mm.h
> > > +++ b/include/linux/mm.h
> > > @@ -2642,7 +2642,14 @@ struct pfn_range_apply {
> > > };
> > > extern int apply_to_pfn_range(struct pfn_range_apply *closure,
> > > unsigned long address, unsigned long
> > > size);
> > > -
> > > +unsigned long apply_as_wrprotect(struct address_space *mapping,
> > > + pgoff_t first_index, pgoff_t nr);
> > > +unsigned long apply_as_clean(struct address_space *mapping,
> > > + pgoff_t first_index, pgoff_t nr,
> > > + pgoff_t bitmap_pgoff,
> > > + unsigned long *bitmap,
> > > + pgoff_t *start,
> > > + pgoff_t *end);
> > > #ifdef CONFIG_PAGE_POISONING
> > > extern bool page_poisoning_enabled(void);
> > > extern void kernel_poison_pages(struct page *page, int numpages,
> > > int enable);
> > > diff --git a/mm/Makefile b/mm/Makefile
> > > index d210cc9d6f80..a94b78f12692 100644
> > > --- a/mm/Makefile
> > > +++ b/mm/Makefile
> > > @@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ obj-y := filemap.o mempool.o
> > > oom_kill.o fadvise.o \
> > > mm_init.o mmu_context.o percpu.o
> > > slab_common.o \
> > > compaction.o vmacache.o \
> > > interval_tree.o list_lru.o workingset.o \
> > > - debug.o $(mmu-y)
> > > + debug.o apply_as_range.o $(mmu-y)
> > >
> > > obj-y += init-mm.o
> > > obj-y += memblock.o
> > > diff --git a/mm/apply_as_range.c b/mm/apply_as_range.c
> > > new file mode 100644
> > > index 000000000000..9f03e272ebd0
> > > --- /dev/null
> > > +++ b/mm/apply_as_range.c
> > > @@ -0,0 +1,257 @@
> > > +// SPDX-License-Identifier: GPL-2.0
> > > +#include <linux/mm.h>
> > > +#include <linux/mm_types.h>
> > > +#include <linux/hugetlb.h>
> > > +#include <linux/bitops.h>
> > > +#include <asm/cacheflush.h>
> > > +#include <asm/tlbflush.h>
> > > +
> > > +/**
> > > + * struct apply_as - Closure structure for apply_as_range
> > > + * @base: struct pfn_range_apply we derive from
> > > + * @start: Address of first modified pte
> > > + * @end: Address of last modified pte + 1
> > > + * @total: Total number of modified ptes
> > > + * @vma: Pointer to the struct vm_area_struct we're currently
> > > operating on
> > > + * @flush_cache: Whether to call a cache flush before modifying a
> > > pte
> > > + * @flush_tlb: Whether to flush the tlb after modifying a pte
> > > + */
> > > +struct apply_as {
> > > + struct pfn_range_apply base;
> > > + unsigned long start, end;
> > > + unsigned long total;
> > > + const struct vm_area_struct *vma;
> > > + u32 flush_cache : 1;
> > > + u32 flush_tlb : 1;
> > > +};
> > > +
> > > +/**
> > > + * apply_pt_wrprotect - Leaf pte callback to write-protect a pte
> > > + * @pte: Pointer to the pte
> > > + * @token: Page table token, see apply_to_pfn_range()
> > > + * @addr: The virtual page address
> > > + * @closure: Pointer to a struct pfn_range_apply embedded in a
> > > + * struct apply_as
> > > + *
> > > + * The function write-protects a pte and records the range in
> > > + * virtual address space of touched ptes for efficient TLB
> > > flushes.
> > > + *
> > > + * Return: Always zero.
> > > + */
> > > +static int apply_pt_wrprotect(pte_t *pte, pgtable_t token,
> > > + unsigned long addr,
> > > + struct pfn_range_apply *closure)
> > > +{
> > > + struct apply_as *aas = container_of(closure, typeof(*aas),
> > > base);
> > > +
> > > + if (pte_write(*pte)) {
> > > + set_pte_at(closure->mm, addr, pte,
> > > pte_wrprotect(*pte));
> > So there is no flushing here, even for x96 this is wrong. It
> > should be something like:
> > ptep_clear_flush()
> > flush_cache_page() // if pte is pointing to a regular page
> > set_pte_at()
> > update_mmu_cache()
> >
>
> Here cache flushing is done before any leaf function is called.
> According to 1) that should be equivalent, although flushing cache in
> the leaf function is probably more efficient for most use cases. Both
> these functions are no-ops for both x86 and ARM64 where they most
> likely will be used...
>
> For ptep_clear_flush() the TLB flushing is here instead deferred to
> after all leaf functions have been called. It looks like if the PTE is
> dirty, the TLB has no business touching it until then anyway, it should
> be happy with its cached value.
>
> Since flushing a single tlb page involves a broadcast across all cores,
> I believe flushing a range is a pretty important optimization.

Reading the code i missed the range flush below, it should be ok but
you should be using ptep_modify_prot_start()/ptep_modify_prot_commit()
pattern. I think some arch like to be involve in pte changes and the
2 patterns so far in the kernel (AFAIK) is ptep_clear_flush() or the
ptep_modify_prot_start//ptep_modify_prot_commit so i believe it is
better to stick to one of those instead of introducing a third one.
>
> Also for update_mmu_cache() the impression I got from its docs is that
> it should only be used when increasing pte permissions, like in fault
> handlers, not the opposite?

I think some arch rely on it for something else but if you use the
range flushing properly you should not need it.

> >
> > > + aas->total++;
> > > + if (addr < aas->start)
> > > + aas->start = addr;
> > > + if (addr + PAGE_SIZE > aas->end)
> > > + aas->end = addr + PAGE_SIZE;
> > > + }
> > > +
> > > + return 0;
> > > +}
> > > +
> > > +/**
> > > + * struct apply_as_clean - Closure structure for apply_as_clean
> > > + * @base: struct apply_as we derive from
> > > + * @bitmap_pgoff: Address_space Page offset of the first bit in
> > > @bitmap
> > > + * @bitmap: Bitmap with one bit for each page offset in the
> > > address_space range
> > > + * covered.
> > > + * @start: Address_space page offset of first modified pte
> > > + * @end: Address_space page offset of last modified pte
> > > + */
> > > +struct apply_as_clean {
> > > + struct apply_as base;
> > > + pgoff_t bitmap_pgoff;
> > > + unsigned long *bitmap;
> > > + pgoff_t start, end;
> > > +};
> > > +
> > > +/**
> > > + * apply_pt_clean - Leaf pte callback to clean a pte
> > > + * @pte: Pointer to the pte
> > > + * @token: Page table token, see apply_to_pfn_range()
> > > + * @addr: The virtual page address
> > > + * @closure: Pointer to a struct pfn_range_apply embedded in a
> > > + * struct apply_as_clean
> > > + *
> > > + * The function cleans a pte and records the range in
> > > + * virtual address space of touched ptes for efficient TLB
> > > flushes.
> > > + * It also records dirty ptes in a bitmap representing page
> > > offsets
> > > + * in the address_space, as well as the first and last of the bits
> > > + * touched.
> > > + *
> > > + * Return: Always zero.
> > > + */
> > > +static int apply_pt_clean(pte_t *pte, pgtable_t token,
> > > + unsigned long addr,
> > > + struct pfn_range_apply *closure)
> > > +{
> > > + struct apply_as *aas = container_of(closure, typeof(*aas),
> > > base);
> > > + struct apply_as_clean *clean = container_of(aas,
> > > typeof(*clean), base);
> > > +
> > > + if (pte_dirty(*pte)) {
> > > + pgoff_t pgoff = ((addr - aas->vma->vm_start) >>
> > > PAGE_SHIFT) +
> > > + aas->vma->vm_pgoff - clean->bitmap_pgoff;
> > > +
> > > + set_pte_at(closure->mm, addr, pte, pte_mkclean(*pte));
> >
> > Clearing the dirty bit is racy, it should be done with write protect
> > instead as the dirty bit can be set again just after you clear it.
> > So i am not sure what is the usage pattern where you want to clear
> > that bit without write protect.
>
> If it's set again, then it will be picked up at the next GPU command
> submission referencing this page i. e. the next run of this function.
> What we're after here is to get to all pages that were dirtied *before*
> this call. The raciness and remedy (if desired) is mentioned in the
> comments to the exported function below. Typically users write-protect
> before scanning dirty bits only if transitioning to mkwrite-dirtying.
> The important thing is that we don't accidently clear dirty bits
> without picking them up.

Fair enough.

> >
> > You also need proper page flushing with flush_cache_page()
> >
> > > + aas->total++;
> > > + if (addr < aas->start)
> > > + aas->start = addr;
> > > + if (addr + PAGE_SIZE > aas->end)
> > > + aas->end = addr + PAGE_SIZE;
> > > +
> > > + __set_bit(pgoff, clean->bitmap);
> > > + clean->start = min(clean->start, pgoff);
> > > + clean->end = max(clean->end, pgoff + 1);
> > > + }
> > > +
> > > + return 0;
> > > +}
> > > +
> > > +/**
> > > + * apply_as_range - Apply a pte callback to all PTEs pointing into
> > > a range
> > > + * of an address_space.
> > > + * @mapping: Pointer to the struct address_space
> > > + * @aas: Closure structure
> > > + * @first_index: First page offset in the address_space
> > > + * @nr: Number of incremental page offsets to cover
> > > + *
> > > + * Return: Number of ptes touched. Note that this number might be
> > > larger
> > > + * than @nr if there are overlapping vmas
> > > + */
> >
> > This comment need to be _scary_ it should only be use for device
> > driver
> > vma ie device driver mapping.
> >
> > > +static unsigned long apply_as_range(struct address_space *mapping,
> > > + struct apply_as *aas,
> > > + pgoff_t first_index, pgoff_t nr)
> > > +{
> > > + struct vm_area_struct *vma;
> > > + pgoff_t vba, vea, cba, cea;
> > > + unsigned long start_addr, end_addr;
> > > +
> > > + /* FIXME: Is a read lock sufficient here? */
> > > + down_write(&mapping->i_mmap_rwsem);
> >
> > read would be sufficient and you should use i_mmap_lock_read() not
> > the down_write/read API.
> >
> > > + vma_interval_tree_foreach(vma, &mapping->i_mmap, first_index,
> > > + first_index + nr - 1) {
> > > + aas->base.mm = vma->vm_mm;
> > > +
> > > + /* Clip to the vma */
> > > + vba = vma->vm_pgoff;
> > > + vea = vba + vma_pages(vma);
> > > + cba = first_index;
> > > + cba = max(cba, vba);
> > > + cea = first_index + nr;
> > > + cea = min(cea, vea);
> > > +
> > > + /* Translate to virtual address */
> > > + start_addr = ((cba - vba) << PAGE_SHIFT) + vma-
> > > >vm_start;
> > > + end_addr = ((cea - vba) << PAGE_SHIFT) + vma->vm_start;
> > > +
> > > + /*
> > > + * TODO: Should caches be flushed individually on
> > > demand
> > > + * in the leaf-pte callbacks instead? That is, how
> > > + * costly are inter-core interrupts in an SMP system?
> > > + */
> > > + if (aas->flush_cache)
> > > + flush_cache_range(vma, start_addr, end_addr);
> >
> > flush_cache_range() is a noop on most architecture what you really
> > need
> > is proper per page flushing see above.
>
> From the docs 1) they are interchangeable. But I will change to
> per-page cache flushing anyway.

Yeah you can do flush_cache_range() it is fine.

Cheers,
Jérôme

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-03-21 22:08    [W:0.083 / U:0.600 seconds]
©2003-2018 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site