lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Dec]   [9]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH v2 2/4] ptrace: add PTRACE_GETFD request to fetch file descriptors from tracees
On Mon, Dec 09, 2019 at 02:55:40AM -0800, Sargun Dhillon wrote:
> On Mon, Dec 9, 2019 at 1:39 AM Christian Brauner
> <christian.brauner@ubuntu.com> wrote:
> >
> > Hey Sargun,
> >
> > Thanks for the patch!
> Thanks for your review.
>
> >
> > Why not simply accept O_CLOEXEC as flag? If that's not possible for some
> > reason I'd say
> >
> I did this initially. My plan is to use this options field for other
> (future) things as well, like
> clearing (cgroup) metadata on sockets (assuming we figure out a safe
> way to do it).
> If we use O_CLOEXEC, it takes up an arbitrary bit which is different
> on different
> platforms, and working around that seems messy
>
> Another way around this would be to have two members. One member which
> is something
> like fdflags, that just takes the fd flags, like O_CLOEXEC, and then
> later on, we can add
> an options member to enable these future use cases.

That honestly sounds cleaner to me. I really don't like this flag
explosion for CLOEXEC. Every new kernel api we add that deals with fds
comes with their own set of CLOEXEC flags. The minimal thing to do is
to make sure that at least
NEW_CLOEXEC_THINGY == O_CLOEXEC.

>
> What do you think?
> > #define PTRACE_GETFD_O_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC /* open the fd with cloexec */
> >
> > is the right thing to do. This is fairly common:
> >
> > include/uapi/linux/timerfd.h:#define TFD_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC
> > include/uapi/drm/drm.h:#define DRM_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC
> > include/linux/userfaultfd_k.h:#define UFFD_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC
> > include/linux/eventfd.h:#define EFD_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC
> > include/uapi/linux/eventpoll.h:#define EPOLL_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC
> > include/uapi/linux/inotify.h:/* For O_CLOEXEC and O_NONBLOCK */
> > include/uapi/linux/inotify.h:#define IN_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC
> > include/uapi/linux/mount.h:#define OPEN_TREE_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC /* Close the file on execve() */
> >
> > You can also add a compile-time assert to ptrace like we did for
> > fs/namespace.c's OPEN_TREE_CLOEXEC:
> > BUILD_BUG_ON(OPEN_TREE_CLOEXEC != O_CLOEXEC);
> >
> > And I'd remove the _O if you go with a separate flag, i.e.:
> >
> > #define PTRACE_GETFD_CLOEXEC O_CLOEXEC /* open the fd with cloexec */
> >
> > > +
> > > +struct ptrace_getfd_args {
> > > + __u32 fd; /* the tracee's file descriptor to get */
> > > + __u32 options;
> >
> > Nit and I'm not set on it at all but "flags" might just be better.
> >
> > > +} __attribute__((packed));
> >
> > What's the benefit in using __attribute__((packed)) here? Seems to me that:
> >
> 1) Are we always to assume that the compiler will give us 4-byte
> alignment (paranoia)
> 2) If we're to add new non-4-byte aligned members later on, is it
> kosher to add packed
> later on?

Using explicit padding is the more common way we do this (e.g. struct
open_how, struct statx and a lot more add explicit padding to guarantee
alignment.).

>
> > +struct ptrace_getfd_args {
> > + __u32 fd; /* the tracee's file descriptor to get */
> > + __u32 options;
> > +};
> >
> > would just work fine.
> >
> > > +
> > > /*
> > > * These values are stored in task->ptrace_message
> > > * by tracehook_report_syscall_* to describe the current syscall-stop.
> > > diff --git a/kernel/ptrace.c b/kernel/ptrace.c
> > > index cb9ddcc08119..8f619dceac6f 100644
> > > --- a/kernel/ptrace.c
> > > +++ b/kernel/ptrace.c
> > > @@ -31,6 +31,7 @@
> > > #include <linux/cn_proc.h>
> > > #include <linux/compat.h>
> > > #include <linux/sched/signal.h>
> > > +#include <linux/fdtable.h>
> > >
> > > #include <asm/syscall.h> /* for syscall_get_* */
> > >
> > > @@ -994,6 +995,33 @@ ptrace_get_syscall_info(struct task_struct *child, unsigned long user_size,
> > > }
> > > #endif /* CONFIG_HAVE_ARCH_TRACEHOOK */
> > >
> > > +static int ptrace_getfd(struct task_struct *child, unsigned long user_size,
> > > + void __user *datavp)
> > > +{
> > > + struct ptrace_getfd_args args;
> > > + unsigned int fd_flags = 0;
> > > + struct file *file;
> > > + int ret;
> > > +
> > > + ret = copy_struct_from_user(&args, sizeof(args), datavp, user_size);
> > > + if (ret)
> > > + goto out;
> >
> > Why is this goto out and not just return ret?
> >
> > > + if ((args.options & ~(PTRACE_GETFD_O_CLOEXEC)) != 0)
> > > + return -EINVAL;
> > > + if (args.options & PTRACE_GETFD_O_CLOEXEC)
> > > + fd_flags &= O_CLOEXEC;
> > > + file = get_task_file(child, args.fd);
> > > + if (!file)
> > > + return -EBADF;
> > > + ret = get_unused_fd_flags(fd_flags);
> >
> > Why isn't that whole thing just:
> >
> > ret = get_unused_fd_flags(fd_flags & {PTRACE_GETFD_}O_CLOEXEC);
> >
> > > + if (ret >= 0)
> > > + fd_install(ret, file);
> > > + else
> > > + fput(file);
> > > +out:
> > > + return ret;
> > > +}
> >
> > So sm like:
> >
> > static int ptrace_getfd(struct task_struct *child, unsigned long user_size,
> > void __user *datavp)
> > {
> > struct ptrace_getfd_args args;
> > unsigned int fd_flags = 0;
> > struct file *file;
> > int ret;
> >
> > ret = copy_struct_from_user(&args, sizeof(args), datavp, user_size);
> > if (ret)
> > return ret;
> >
> > if ((args.options & ~(PTRACE_GETFD_O_CLOEXEC)) != 0)
> > return -EINVAL;
> >
> > file = get_task_file(child, args.fd);
> > if (!file)
> > return -EBADF;
> >
> > /* PTRACE_GETFD_CLOEXEC == O_CLOEXEC */
> > ret = get_unused_fd_flags(fd_flags & PTRACE_GETFD_O_CLOEXEC);
> Wouldn't this always be 0, since fd_flags is always 0?

You're right, I missed this. Maybe rather:

if (args.options & PTRACE_GETFD_O_CLOEXEC)
fd_flags |= O_CLOEXEC;

Another question is if we shouldn't just make them cloexec by default?
The notifier fds and pidfds already are.

Christian

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-12-09 12:24    [W:3.648 / U:0.008 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site