lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Dec]   [11]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [PATCH 2/2] reset: Add Broadcom STB RESCAL reset controller
From
Date


On 12/11/2019 1:48 AM, Philipp Zabel wrote:
>> +#define BRCM_RESCAL_START 0
>> +#define BRCM_RESCAL_START_BIT BIT(0)
>> +#define BRCM_RESCAL_CTRL 4
>> +#define BRCM_RESCAL_STATUS 8
>> +#define BRCM_RESCAL_STATUS_BIT BIT(0)
>
> Is there any reason the start bit is indented but the status bit is not?

This is a convention we have tried to adopt to denote the definition
from a register word address/offset versus the definition for bits
within that register word.

>
>> +
>> +struct brcm_rescal_reset {
>> + void __iomem *base;
>> + struct device *dev;
>> + struct reset_controller_dev rcdev;
>> +};
>> +
>> +static int brcm_rescal_reset_assert(struct reset_controller_dev *rcdev,
>> + unsigned long id)
>> +{
>> + return 0;
>> +}
>
> Please do not implement the assert operation if it doesn't cause a reset
> line to be asserted afterwards.
> The reset core will return 0 from reset_control_assert() for shared
> reset controls if .assert is not implemented.

OK, will drop it.

>
>> +
>> +static int brcm_rescal_reset_deassert(struct reset_controller_dev *rcdev,
>> + unsigned long id)
>> +{
>> + struct brcm_rescal_reset *data =
>> + container_of(rcdev, struct brcm_rescal_reset, rcdev);
>> + void __iomem *base = data->base;
>> + const int NUM_RETRIES = 10;
>> + u32 reg;
>> + int i;
>> +
>> + reg = readl(base + BRCM_RESCAL_START);
>> + writel(reg | BRCM_RESCAL_START_BIT, base + BRCM_RESCAL_START);
>> + reg = readl(base + BRCM_RESCAL_START);
>
> Are there any other fields beside the START_BIT in this register?

This is the only bit actually.

>
>> + if (!(reg & BRCM_RESCAL_START_BIT)) {
>> + dev_err(data->dev, "failed to start sata/pcie rescal\n");
>> + return -EIO;
>> + }
>> +
>> + reg = readl(base + BRCM_RESCAL_STATUS);
>> + for (i = NUM_RETRIES; i >= 0 && !(reg & BRCM_RESCAL_STATUS_BIT); i--) {
>> + udelay(100);
>> + reg = readl(base + BRCM_RESCAL_STATUS);
>> + }
>
> This timeout loop should be replaced by a single readl_poll_timeout().
> At 100 µs waits per iteration this could use the sleeping variant.

OK, will do.

>
>> + if (!(reg & BRCM_RESCAL_STATUS_BIT)) {
>> + dev_err(data->dev, "timedout on sata/pcie rescal\n");
>> + return -ETIMEDOUT;
>> + }
>> +
>> + reg = readl(base + BRCM_RESCAL_START);
>> + writel(reg ^ BRCM_RESCAL_START_BIT, base + BRCM_RESCAL_START);
>
> Please use &= ~BRCM_RESCAL_START_BIT instead.
>

I think the idea was to avoid unconditionally clearing it, but based on
the documentation, I don't see this being harmful, Jim?

>> + reg = readl(base + BRCM_RESCAL_START);
>> + dev_dbg(data->dev, "sata/pcie rescal success\n");
>> +
>> + return 0;
>> +}
>
> This whole function looks a lot like it doesn't just deassert a reset
> line, but actually issues a complete reset procedure of some kind. Do
> you have some insight on what actually happens in the hardware when the
> start bit is triggered? I suspect this should be implemented with the
> .reset operation.

This hardware block is controlling the reset and calibration process of
the SATA/PCIe combo PHY analog front end, but is not technically part of
the PCIe or SATA PHY proper, it stands on its own, both functionally and
from a register space perspective. The motivation for modelling this as
a reset controller is that it does a reset (and a calibration) and this
is a shared reset line among 2/3 instances of another block. If you
think we should model this differently, please let us know.
--
Florian

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-12-11 19:13    [W:0.056 / U:1.244 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site