lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Oct]   [23]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH v6] taskstats: fix data-race
On Wed, Oct 23, 2019 at 3:11 PM Christian Brauner
<christian.brauner@ubuntu.com> wrote:
>
> On Wed, Oct 23, 2019 at 02:39:55PM +0200, Dmitry Vyukov wrote:
> > On Wed, Oct 23, 2019 at 2:16 PM Andrea Parri <parri.andrea@gmail.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > On Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 01:33:27PM +0200, Christian Brauner wrote:
> > > > When assiging and testing taskstats in taskstats_exit() there's a race
> > > > when writing and reading sig->stats when a thread-group with more than
> > > > one thread exits:
> > > >
> > > > cpu0:
> > > > thread catches fatal signal and whole thread-group gets taken down
> > > > do_exit()
> > > > do_group_exit()
> > > > taskstats_exit()
> > > > taskstats_tgid_alloc()
> > > > The tasks reads sig->stats without holding sighand lock.
> > > >
> > > > cpu1:
> > > > task calls exit_group()
> > > > do_exit()
> > > > do_group_exit()
> > > > taskstats_exit()
> > > > taskstats_tgid_alloc()
> > > > The task takes sighand lock and assigns new stats to sig->stats.
> > > >
> > > > The first approach used smp_load_acquire() and smp_store_release().
> > > > However, after having discussed this it seems that the data dependency
> > > > for kmem_cache_alloc() would be fixed by WRITE_ONCE().
> > > > Furthermore, the smp_load_acquire() would only manage to order the stats
> > > > check before the thread_group_empty() check. So it seems just using
> > > > READ_ONCE() and WRITE_ONCE() will do the job and I wanted to bring this
> > > > up for discussion at least.
> > >
> > > Mmh, the RELEASE was intended to order the memory initialization in
> > > kmem_cache_zalloc() with the later ->stats pointer assignment; AFAICT,
> > > there is no data dependency between such memory accesses.
> >
> > I agree. This needs smp_store_release. The latest version that I
> > looked at contained:
> > smp_store_release(&sig->stats, stats_new);
>
> This is what really makes me wonder. Can the compiler really re-order
> the kmem_cache_zalloc() call with the assignment.

Yes.
Not sure about compiler, but hardware definitely can. And generally
one does not care if it's compiler or hardware.

> If that's really the
> case then shouldn't all allocation functions have compiler barriers in
> them? This then seems like a very generic problem.

No.
One puts memory barriers into synchronization primitives.
This equally affects memset's, memcpy's and in fact all normal stores.
Adding a memory barrier to every normal store is not the solution to
this. The memory barrier is done before publication of the memory. And
we already have smp_store_release for this. So if one doesn't publish
objects with a plain store (which breaks all possible rules anyways)
and uses a proper primitive, there is no problem.

> > > Correspondingly, the ACQUIRE was intended to order the ->stats pointer
> > > load with later, _independent dereferences of the same pointer; the
> > > latter are, e.g., in taskstats_exit() (but not thread_group_empty()).
> >
> > How these later loads can be completely independent of the pointer
> > value? They need to obtain the pointer value from somewhere. And this
> > can only be done by loaded it. And if a thread loads a pointer and
> > then dereferences that pointer, that's a data/address dependency and
> > we assume this is now covered by READ_ONCE.
> > Or these later loads of the pointer can also race with the store? If
>
> To clarify, later loads as in taskstats_exit() and thread_group_empty(),
> not the later load in the double-checked locking case.
>
> > so, I think they also need to use READ_ONCE (rather than turn this earlier
> > pointer load into acquire).
>
> Using READ_ONCE() in the alloc, taskstat_exit(), and
> thread_group_empty() case.
>
> Christian

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-10-23 15:21    [W:0.117 / U:5.340 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site