lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2019]   [Jan]   [31]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH v2] ALSA: hda/tegra: enable clock during probe
Date
On Thursday, January 31, 2019 3:30:24 PM CET Thierry Reding wrote:
>
> --Pk/CTwBz1VvfPIDp
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Disposition: inline
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 01:10:01PM +0100, Rafael J. Wysocki wrote:
> > On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 12:59 PM Takashi Iwai <tiwai@suse.de> wrote:
> > >
> > > On Thu, 31 Jan 2019 12:46:54 +0100,
> > > Rafael J. Wysocki wrote:
> > > >
> > > > On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 12:21 PM Takashi Iwai <tiwai@suse.de> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > On Thu, 31 Jan 2019 12:05:30 +0100,
> > > > > Thierry Reding wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 05:40:42PM +0100, Takashi Iwai wrote:
> > > >
> > > > [cut]
> > > >
> > > > > > > If I understand correctly the code, the pm domain is already ac=
> tivated
> > > > > > > at calling driver's probe callback.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > As far as I can tell, the domain will also be powered off again a=
> fter
> > > > > > probe finished, unless the device grabs a runtime PM reference. T=
> his is
> > > > > > what happens via the dev->pm_domain->sync() call after successful=
> probe
> > > > > > of a driver.
> > > > >
> > > > > Ah, a good point. This can be a problem with a probe work like this
> > > > > case.
> > > > >
> > > > > > It seems to me like it's not a very well defined case what to do =
> when a
> > > > > > device needs to be powered up but runtime PM is not enabled.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Adding Rafael and linux-pm, maybe they can provide some guidance =
> on what
> > > > > > to do in these situations.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > To summarize, what we're debating here is how to handle powering =
> up a
> > > > > > device if the pm_runtime infrastructure doesn't take care of it. =
> Jon's
> > > > > > proposal here was, and we use this elsewhere, to do something lik=
> e this:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > pm_runtime_enable(dev);
> > > > > > if (!pm_runtime_enabled(dev)) {
> > > > > > err =3D foo_runtime_resume(dev);
> > > > > > if (err < 0)
> > > > > > goto fail;
> > > > > > }
> > > > > >
> > > > > > So basically when runtime PM is not available, we explicitly "res=
> ume"
> > > > > > the device to power it up.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > It seems to me like that's a fairly common problem, so I'm wonder=
> ing if
> > > > > > there's something that the runtime PM core could do to help with =
> this.
> > > > > > Or perhaps there's already a way to achieve this that we're all
> > > > > > overlooking?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Rafael, any suggestions?
> > > > >
> > > > > If any, a common helper would be appreciated, indeed.
> > > >
> > > > I'm not sure that I understand the problem correctly, so let me
> > > > restate it the way I understand it.
> > > >
> > > > What we're talking about is a driver ->probe() callback. Runtime PM
> > > > is disabled initially and the device is off. It needs to be powered
> > > > up, but the way to do that depends on some configuration of the board
> > > > etc., so ideally
> > > >
> > > > pm_runtime_enable(dev);
> > > > ret =3D pm_runtime_resume(dev);
> > > >
> > > > should just work, but the question is what to do if runtime PM doesn't
> > > > work as expected. That is, CONFIG_PM_RUNTIME is unset? Or something
> > > > else?
> > >
> > > Yes, the question is how to write the code for both with and without
> > > CONFIG_PM (or CONFIG_PM_RUNTIME).
> >=20
> > This basically is about setup, because after that point all should
> > just work in both cases.
> >=20
> > Personally, I would do
> >=20
> > if (IS_ENABLED(CONFIG_PM)) {
> > do setup based on pm-runtime
> > } else {
> > do manual setup
> > }
> >=20
> > > Right now, we have a code like below, pushing the initialization in an
> > > async work and let the probe returning quickly.
> > >
> > > hda_tegra_probe() {
> > > ....
> >=20
> > So why don't you do
> >=20
> > if (!IS_ENABLED(CONFIG_PM)) {
> > do manual clock setup
> > }
> >=20
> > here?
>
> I think that's exactly what Jon and Sameer were proposing, although the
> discussion started primarily because of the way it was done.
>
> So basically the idea was to do:
>
> pm_runtime_enable()
> if (!pm_runtime_enabled()) /* basically !IS_ENABLED(CONFIG_PM) */

But why is it any better than checking !IS_ENABLED(CONFIG_PM) directly?

> hda_runtime_resume()
>
> So we're not calling pm_runtime_resume() but rather the driver's
> implementation of it. This is to avoid duplicating the code, which under
> some circumstances can be fairly long. Duplicating is also error prone
> because both instances may not always be in sync.
>
> My understanding is that Takashi had reservations about using this kind
> of construct because, well, frankly, it looks a little weird.

Yes, the way it was originally written above was weird, but is checking
IS_ENABLED(CONFIG_PM) directly really so weird?

> We'd also likely want to have a similar construct again in the ->remove()
> callback to make sure we properly power off the device when it is no longer
> needed.

Sure. Again, why don't you make it conditional on IS_ENABLED(CONFIG_PM)?

> I'm just wondering if perhaps there should be a mechanism in the
> core to take care of this,

How exactly? How's the core going to know what to do when CONFIG_PM is
disabled?

> because this is basically something that we'd need to do for every single
> driver.

That is not true. If the device is alwyas "on" to start with, you don't
need to do anything. That's the case on many systems.

> For example, if !CONFIG_PM couldn't the pm_runtime_enable() function be
> modified to do the above?

But you'd need to pass a pointer to your hda_runtime_resume() to it at least
and how's that simpler than using a simple conditional directly?

> This would be somewhat tricky because drivers
> usually use SET_RUNTIME_PM_OPS to populate the struct dev_pm_ops and
> that would result in an empty structure if !CONFIG_PM, but we could
> probably work around that by adding a __SET_RUNTIME_PM_OPS that would
> never be compiled out for this kind of case. Or such drivers could even
> manually set .runtime_suspend and .runtime_resume to make sure they're
> always populated.
>
> Another way out of this would be to make sure we never run into the case
> where runtime PM is disabled. If we always "select PM" on Tegra, then PM
> should always be available. But is it guaranteed that runtime PM for the
> devices is functional in that case? From a cursory look at the code it
> would seem that way.

If you select PM, then all of the requisite code should be there.

Alternatively, you can make the driver depend on PM.

Cheers,
Rafael

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2019-02-01 00:27    [W:0.098 / U:14.084 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site