lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2018]   [Sep]   [13]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: Multi-parent IRQ domains
From
Date


On 09/13/18 08:59, Thierry Reding wrote:
> Hi everyone,
>
> I've been trying to implement a feature on recent Tegra chips that's
> called "wake events". These wake events are implemented as part of the
> power management controller (PMC) and they control which events can be
> used to wake the system from suspend. Events include things like an
> alarm interrupt from an RTC, or the GPIO interrupt hooked up to a
> power button for example.
>
> We already have a driver for a couple of other things that the PMC does,
> so I thought it'd be natural to implement this functionality as an IRQ
> chip in the PMC driver. The way that this would work is that for all the
> devices that are wakeup sources, we'd end up specifying the PMC as the
> interrupt parent and the PMC would then itself have the main GIC as its
> parent. That way, the hierarchical IRQ domain infrastructure would take
> care of pretty much everything.
>
> Unfortunately I've run into some issues here. One problem that I'm
> facing is that PMC could have more than one parent. For example, the RTC
> alarm interrupt goes straight to the GIC, but the power button GPIO goes
> through the GPIO controller first and then to the GIC. This doesn't seem
> to be something that's currently possible.
>
> The way I imagine this to work from a DT perspective is as follows:

There is an interrupts-extended property which as a first cell takes a
phandle to the parent interrupt controller, e.g:

interrupts-extended = <&gic 73 GIPC_SPI IRQ_TYPE_LEVEL_HIGH>,
<&pmc 10>;

(provided that I understood your problem and example correctly). We have
a similar use case on our STB chips where we have "main" interrupts
wired to the ARM GIC and wake-up interrupts wired to a specific wake-up
interrupt controller in an always-on domain. The two controllers have a
different #interrupt-cells specifier.

The interrupt infrastructure in Linux already knows how to deal with
that and whether you use of_get_irq() or platform_get_irq() you should
obtain the correct virtual interrupt numbers that you expected, parented
to the appropriate interrupt controller.

Hope this helps.
--
Florian

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2018-09-13 23:50    [W:1.015 / U:2.316 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site