lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2018]   [Aug]   [16]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
SubjectRe: [PATCH v3 07/14] sched/core: uclamp: enforce last task UCLAMP_MAX
From
Date
On 08/16/2018 06:47 PM, Patrick Bellasi wrote:
> On 16-Aug 17:43, Dietmar Eggemann wrote:
>> On 08/06/2018 06:39 PM, Patrick Bellasi wrote:
>>> When a util_max clamped task sleeps, its clamp constraints are removed
>> >from the CPU. However, the blocked utilization on that CPU can still be
>>> higher than the max clamp value enforced while that task was running.
>>> This max clamp removal when a CPU is going to be idle could thus allow
>>> unwanted CPU frequency increases, right while the task is not running.
>>
>> So 'rq->uclamp.flags == UCLAMP_FLAG_IDLE' means CPU is IDLE because
>> non-clamped tasks are tracked as well ((group_id = 0)).
>
> Right, but... with (group_id = 0) you mean that "non-clamped tasks are
> tracked" in the first clamp group?

Yes. I was asking myself what will happen if there are only non-clamped
tasks runnable ...

>
>> Maybe this is worth mentioning here?
>
> Maybe I can explicitely say that we detect that there are not RUNNABLE
> tasks because all the clamp groups are in UCLAMP_NOT_VALID status.

Yes, would have helped me the grasp this earlier ...

[...]

>>> diff --git a/kernel/sched/core.c b/kernel/sched/core.c
>>> index bc2beedec7bf..ff76b000bbe8 100644
>>> --- a/kernel/sched/core.c
>>> +++ b/kernel/sched/core.c
>>> @@ -906,7 +906,8 @@ uclamp_group_find(int clamp_id, unsigned int clamp_value)
>>> * For the specified clamp index, this method computes the new CPU utilization
>>> * clamp to use until the next change on the set of RUNNABLE tasks on that CPU.
>>> */
>>> -static inline void uclamp_cpu_update(struct rq *rq, int clamp_id)
>>> +static inline void uclamp_cpu_update(struct rq *rq, int clamp_id,
>>> + unsigned int last_clamp_value)
>>> {
>>> struct uclamp_group *uc_grp = &rq->uclamp.group[clamp_id][0];
>>> int max_value = UCLAMP_NOT_VALID;
>>> @@ -924,6 +925,19 @@ static inline void uclamp_cpu_update(struct rq *rq, int clamp_id)
>>
>> The condition:
>>
>> if (!uclamp_group_active(uc_grp, group_id))
>> continue;
>>
>> in 'for (group_id = 0; group_id <= CONFIG_UCLAMP_GROUPS_COUNT; ++group_id)
>> {}' makes sure that 'max_value == UCLAMP_NOT_VALID' is true for the if
>> condition (*):
>>
>>
>>> if (max_value >= SCHED_CAPACITY_SCALE)
>>> break;
>>> }
>>> +
>>> + /*
>>> + * Just for the UCLAMP_MAX value, in case there are no RUNNABLE
>>> + * task, we keep the CPU clamped to the last task's clamp value.
>>> + * This avoids frequency spikes to MAX when one CPU, with an high
>>> + * blocked utilization, sleeps and another CPU, in the same frequency
>>> + * domain, do not see anymore the clamp on the first CPU.
>>> + */
>>> + if (clamp_id == UCLAMP_MAX && max_value == UCLAMP_NOT_VALID) {
>>> + rq->uclamp.flags |= UCLAMP_FLAG_IDLE;
>>> + max_value = last_clamp_value;
>>> + }
>>> +
>>
>> (*): So the uc_grp[group_id].value stays last_clamp_value?
>
> A bit confusing... but I think you've got the point.

OK.

>
>> What do you do when the blocked utilization decays below this enforced
>> last_clamp_value on that CPU?
>
> This is done _just_ for max_util:
> - it clamps a blocked utilization bigger then last_clamp_value
> thus avoiding the selection of an OPP bigger then the one enforced
> while the task was runnable
> - it has not effect on a blocked utilization smaller then last_clamp_value
> thus allowing to reduce gracefully the OPP as long as the blocked
> utilization is decayed

Ah correct, max_util is about capping, not boosting.

>
>> I assume there are plenty of this kind of corner cases because we have
>> blocked signals (including all tasks) and clamping (including runnable
>> tasks).
>
> This is a pretty compelling one I've noticed in my tests and thus
> worth a fix... I don't have on hand other similar corner cases, do
> you?

No not right now, will continue to watch out for them ...

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2018-08-16 19:12    [W:0.070 / U:5.728 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site