lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2018]   [May]   [30]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: LKMM litmus test for Roman Penyaev's rcu-rr
On Wed, 30 May 2018, Paul E. McKenney wrote:

> > > My current guess is that we need to change the memory-model tool. If
> > > that is the case, here are some possible resolutions:
> > >
> > > 1. Make herd's C-language control dependencies work the same as its
> > > assembly language, so that they extend beyond the end of the
> > > "if" statement. I believe that this would make Roman's case
> > > work, but it could claim that other situations are safe that
> > > are actually problematic due to compiler optimizations.
> > >
> > > The fact that the model currently handles only READ_ONCE()
> > > and WRITE_ONCE() and not unmarked reads and writes make this
> > > option more attractive than it otherwise be, compilers not
> > > being allowed to reorder volatile accesses, but we are likely
> > > to introduce unmarked accesses sometime in the future.
> >
> > Preserving the order of volatile accesses isn't sufficient. The
> > compiler is still allowed to translate
> >
> > r1 = READ_ONCE(x);
> > if (r1) {
> > ...
> > }
> > WRITE_ONCE(y, r2);
> >
> > into something resembling
> >
> > r1 = READ_ONCE(x);
> > WRITE_ONCE(y, r2);
> > if (r1) {
> > ...
> > }
> >
> > (provided the "..." part doesn't contain any volatile accesses,
> > barriers, or anything affecting r2), which would destroy any run-time
> > control dependency. The CPU could then execute the write before the
> > read.
>
> True, but almost all current litmus tests do have at least one volatile
> access in their "if" statements. I am guessing that this has the same
> memory-model tooling issues as #2 below, but I am as usual happy to be
> proven wrong. ;-)

It shouldn't be all that bad. The dependencies are generated by herd,
meaning that the code would have to be changed to make control
dependencies extend beyond the ends of "if" statements. I don't think
the necessary changes would be tremendously big, especially since the
LISA front end already behaves this way.

> > > 2. Like #1 above, but only if something in one of the "if"'s
> > > branches would prevent the compiler from reordering
> > > (smp_mb(), synchronize_rcu(), value-returning non-relaxed
> > > RMW atomic, ...). Easy for me to say, but I am guessing
> > > that much violence would be needed to the tooling to make
> > > this work. ;-)
> >
> > This would be my preference. But I'm afraid it isn't practical at the
> > moment.
>
> I bet that some combination of scripting and smallish modifications to
> tooling could make it happen in reasonably short term. Might be more
> difficult to make something more future-proof, though, agreed.

I have no idea what sort of scripting/smallish modifications could do
the job. You could ask Luc, if you're not afraid of giving him an
aneurysm. :-)

> > > If I understand Alan correctly, there is not an obvious way to make
> > > this change within the confines of the memory model's .bell and .cat
> > > files.
> >
> > No way at all. It would require significant changes to herd's internal
> > workings and its external interface -- my original point.
>
> I was afraid of that. ;-)
>
> Though truth be told, I was expecting an issue like this to crop up
> sooner rather than later, so I was actually getting a bit nervous
> about the fact that it had not yet shown itself...

The fact is, herd was never meant to act like a compiler. Some
disagreements are inevitable.

Alan

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2018-05-30 22:29    [W:0.141 / U:0.768 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site