lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2018]   [May]   [21]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH v4 03/31] kconfig: reference environment variables directly and remove 'option env='
On Mon, May 21, 2018 at 1:06 PM, Ulf Magnusson <ulfalizer@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Mon, May 21, 2018 at 6:43 AM, Masahiro Yamada
> <yamada.masahiro@socionext.com> wrote:
>> Hi.
>>
>>
>>
>> 2018-05-21 0:46 GMT+09:00 Ulf Magnusson <ulfalizer@gmail.com>:
>>
>>> s/environments/environment variables/
>>
>> Will fix.
>>
>>
>>>
>>>> + * They will be written out to include/config/auto.conf.cmd
>>>> + */
>>>> + env_add(name, value);
>>>> +
>>>> + return xstrdup(value);
>>>> +}
>>>> +
>>>> +void env_write_dep(FILE *f, const char *autoconfig_name)
>>>> +{
>>>> + struct env *e, *tmp;
>>>> +
>>>> + list_for_each_entry_safe(e, tmp, &env_list, node) {
>>>> + fprintf(f, "ifneq \"$(%s)\" \"%s\"\n", e->name, e->value);
>>>> + fprintf(f, "%s: FORCE\n", autoconfig_name);
>>>> + fprintf(f, "endif\n");
>>>> + env_del(e);
>>>> + }
>>>> +}
>>>> +
>>>> +static char *eval_clause(const char *in)
>>>> +{
>>>> + char *res, *name;
>>>> +
>>>> + /*
>>>> + * Returns an empty string because '$()' should be evaluated
>>>> + * to a null string.
>>>> + */
>>>
>>> Do you know of cases where this is more useful than erroring out?
>>>
>>> Not saying it doesn't make sense. Just curious.
>>
>>
>> I just followed how Make works.
>>
>> Anyway, eval_clause() will return null string for null input.
>> I will remove that hunk.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>>> + if (!*in)
>>>> + return xstrdup("");
>>>> +
>>>> + name = expand_string(in);
>>>> +
>>>> + res = env_expand(name);
>>>> + free(name);
>>>> +
>>>> + return res;
>>>> +}
>>>> +
>>>> +/*
>>>> + * Expand a string that follows '$'
>>>> + *
>>>> + * For example, if the input string is
>>>> + * ($(FOO)$($(BAR)))$(BAZ)
>>>> + * this helper evaluates
>>>> + * $($(FOO)$($(BAR)))
>>>> + * and returns the resulted string, then updates 'str' to point to the next
>>>
>>> s/resulted/resulting/
>>>
>>> Maybe something like this would make the behavior a bit clearer:
>>>
>>> ...and returns a new string containing the expansion, also advancing
>>> 'str' to point to the next character after... (note that this function does
>>> a recursive expansion) ...
>>
>>
>> Is this OK?
>>
>> /*
>> * Expand a string that follows '$'
>> *
>> * For example, if the input string is
>> * ($(FOO)$($(BAR)))$(BAZ)
>> * this helper evaluates
>> * $($(FOO)$($(BAR)))
>> * and returns a new string containing the expansion (note that the string is
>> * recursively expanded), also advancing 'str' to point to the next character
>> * after the corresponding closing parenthesis, in this case, *str will be
>> * $(BAR)
>> */
>
> Looks fine to me.
>
>>
>>
>>
>>>> + * character after the corresponding closing parenthesis, in this case, *str
>>>> + * will be
>>>> + * $(BAR)
>>>> + */
>>>> +char *expand_dollar(const char **str)
>>>> +{
>>>> + const char *p = *str;
>>>> + const char *q;
>>>> + char *tmp, *out;
>>>> + int nest = 0;
>>>> +
>>>> + /* '$$' represents an escaped '$' */
>>>> + if (*p == '$') {
>>>> + *str = p + 1;
>>>> + return xstrdup("$");
>>>> + }
>>>> +
>>>> + /*
>>>> + * Kconfig does not support single-letter variable as in $A
>>>> + * or curly braces as in ${CC}.
>>>> + */
>>>> + if (*p != '(')
>>>> + pperror("syntax error: '$' not followed by '('", p);
>>>
>>> Could say "not followed by '(' by or '$'".
>>
>> Will do.
>>
>>
>>>> +
>>>> + p++;
>>>> + q = p;
>>>> + while (*q) {
>>>> + if (*q == '(') {
>>>> + nest++;
>>>> + } else if (*q == ')') {
>>>> + if (nest-- == 0)
>>>> + break;
>>>> + }
>>>> + q++;
>>>> + }
>>>> +
>>>> + if (!*q)
>>>> + pperror("unterminated reference to '%s': missing ')'", p);
>>>> +
>>>> + tmp = xmalloc(q - p + 1);
>>>> + memcpy(tmp, p, q - p);
>>>> + tmp[q - p] = 0;
>>>> + *str = q + 1;
>>>> + out = eval_clause(tmp);
>>>> + free(tmp);
>>>> +
>>>> + return out;
>>>
>>> This might be a bit clearer, since the 'str' update and the expansion
>>> are independent:
>>
>> Indeed, will do.
>>
>>>
>>> /* Advance 'str' to after the expanded initial portion of the string */
>>> *str = q + 1;
>>>
>>> /* Save the "FOO" part of "(FOO)" into 'tmp' and expand it recursively */
>>> tmp = xmalloc(q - p + 1);
>>> memcpy(tmp, p, q - p);
>>> tmp[q - p] = '\0';
>>> out = eval_clause(tmp);
>>> free(tmp);
>>>
>>> return out;
>>>
>>> ...or switched around, but thought putting the 'str' bit first might
>>> emphasize that it isn't modified.
>>
>>
>> I prefer advancing the pointer at last.
>
> Yeah, it's a bit less weird in a way...
>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>>> +}
>>>> +
>>>> +/*
>>>> + * Expand variables in the given string. Undefined variables
>>>> + * expand to an empty string.
>>>
>>> I wonder what the tradeoffs are vs. erroring out here (or leaving
>>> undefined variables as-is).
>>
>>
>> I want to stick to the Make-like behavior here and exploit it in some cases.
>> We can set some variables in some arch/*/Kconfig,
>> but unset in the others.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> In some arch/*/Kconfig:
>>
>> min-gcc-version := 40900
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> In init/Kconfig:
>>
>> # GCC 4.5 is required to build Linux Kernel.
>> # Some architectures may override it (from arch/*/Kconfig) for their
>> requirement.
>> min-gcc-version := $(if,$(min-gcc-version),$(min-gcc-version),40500)
>>
>> ... check the gcc version, then show error
>> if it is older than $(min-gcc-version).
>
> OK, makes sense. Fine by me.
>
>>>> + * The returned string must be freed when done.
>>>> + */
>>>> +char *expand_string(const char *in)
>>>> +{
>>>> + const char *prev_in, *p;
>>>> + char *new, *out;
>>>> + size_t outlen;
>>>> +
>>>> + out = xmalloc(1);
>>>> + *out = 0;
>>>> +
>>>> + while ((p = strchr(in, '$'))) {
>>>> + prev_in = in;
>>>> + in = p + 1;
>>>> + new = expand_dollar(&in);
>>>> + outlen = strlen(out) + (p - prev_in) + strlen(new) + 1;
>>>> + out = xrealloc(out, outlen);
>>>> + strncat(out, prev_in, p - prev_in);
>>>> + strcat(out, new);
>>>> + free(new);
>>>
>>> Some code duplication with expand_one_token() here. Do you think
>>> something could be factored out/reorganized?
>>
>>
>> Yes. For example, the following would work.
>> If you prefer that, I can update it in v5.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> static char *__expand_string(const char **str, bool (*is_end)(const char *))
>> {
>> const char *in, *prev_in, *p;
>> char *new, *out;
>> size_t outlen;
>>
>> out = xmalloc(1);
>> *out = 0;
>>
>> p = in = *str;
>>
>> while (1) {
>> if (*p == '$') {
>> prev_in = in;
>> in = p + 1;
>> new = expand_dollar(&in);
>> outlen = strlen(out) + (p - prev_in) + strlen(new) + 1;
>> out = xrealloc(out, outlen);
>> strncat(out, prev_in, p - prev_in);
>> strcat(out, new);
>> free(new);
>> p = in;
>> continue;
>> }
>>
>> if (is_end(p))
>> break;
>>
>> p++;
>> }
>>
>> outlen = strlen(out) + (p - in) + 1;
>> out = xrealloc(out, outlen);
>> strncat(out, in, p - in);
>>
>> *str = p;
>>
>> return out;
>> }
>>
>> static bool is_end_of_str(const char *s)
>> {
>> return !*s;
>> }
>>
>> char *expand_string(const char *in)
>> {
>> return __expand_string(&in, is_end_of_str);
>> }
>>
>> static bool is_end_of_token(const char *s)
>> {
>> return !(isalnum(*s) || *s == '_' || *s == '-' || *s == '.' ||
>> *s == '/');
>> }
>>
>> char *expand_one_token(const char **str)
>> {
>> return __expand_string(str, is_end_of_token);
>> }
>
> Yep, something like that would be nicer I think.
>
> This variant might work too (untested):
>
> dollar_i = p;

dollar_p makes more sense.

Cheers,
Ulf

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2018-05-21 13:12    [W:0.116 / U:24.820 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site