lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2018]   [Apr]   [19]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH v8 15/18] mm, fs, dax: handle layout changes to pinned dax mappings
On Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 3:44 AM, Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz> wrote:
> On Fri 13-04-18 15:03:51, Dan Williams wrote:
>> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 9:51 AM, Dan Williams <dan.j.williams@intel.com> wrote:
>> > On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 9:49 AM, Jan Kara <jack@suse.cz> wrote:
>> >> On Sat 07-04-18 12:38:24, Dan Williams wrote:
>> > [..]
>> >>> I wonder if this can be trivially solved by using srcu. I.e. we don't
>> >>> need to wait for a global quiescent state, just a
>> >>> get_user_pages_fast() quiescent state. ...or is that an abuse of the
>> >>> srcu api?
>> >>
>> >> Well, I'd rather use the percpu rwsemaphore (linux/percpu-rwsem.h) than
>> >> SRCU. It is a more-or-less standard locking mechanism rather than relying
>> >> on implementation properties of SRCU which is a data structure protection
>> >> method. And the overhead of percpu rwsemaphore for your use case should be
>> >> about the same as that of SRCU.
>> >
>> > I was just about to ask that. Yes, it seems they would share similar
>> > properties and it would be better to use the explicit implementation
>> > rather than a side effect of srcu.
>>
>> ...unfortunately:
>>
>> BUG: sleeping function called from invalid context at
>> ./include/linux/percpu-rwsem.h:34
>> [..]
>> Call Trace:
>> dump_stack+0x85/0xcb
>> ___might_sleep+0x15b/0x240
>> dax_layout_lock+0x18/0x80
>> get_user_pages_fast+0xf8/0x140
>>
>> ...and thinking about it more srcu is a better fit. We don't need the
>> 100% exclusion provided by an rwsem we only need the guarantee that
>> all cpus that might have been running get_user_pages_fast() have
>> finished it at least once.
>>
>> In my tests synchronize_srcu is a bit slower than unpatched for the
>> trivial 100 truncate test, but certainly not the 200x latency you were
>> seeing with syncrhonize_rcu.
>>
>> Elapsed time:
>> 0.006149178 unpatched
>> 0.009426360 srcu
>
> Hum, right. Yesterday I was looking into KSM for a different reason and
> I've noticed it also does writeprotect pages and deals with races with GUP.
> And what KSM relies on is:
>
> write_protect_page()
> ...
> entry = ptep_clear_flush(vma, pvmw.address, pvmw.pte);
> /*
> * Check that no O_DIRECT or similar I/O is in progress on the
> * page
> */
> if (page_mapcount(page) + 1 + swapped != page_count(page)) {
> page used -> bail

Slick.

> }
>
> And this really works because gup_pte_range() does:
>
> page = pte_page(pte);
> head = compound_head(page);
>
> if (!page_cache_get_speculative(head))
> goto pte_unmap;
>
> if (unlikely(pte_val(pte) != pte_val(*ptep))) {
> bail

Need to add a similar check to __gup_device_huge_pmd.

> }
>
> So either write_protect_page() page sees the elevated reference or
> gup_pte_range() bails because it will see the pte changed.
>
> In the truncate path things are a bit different but in principle the same
> should work - once truncate blocks page faults and unmaps pages from page
> tables, we can be sure GUP will not grab the page anymore or we'll see
> elevated page count. So IMO there's no need for any additional locking
> against the GUP path (but a comment explaining this is highly desirable I
> guess).

Yes, those "pte_val(pte) != pte_val(*ptep)" checks should be
documented for the same reason we require comments on rmb/wmb pairs.
I'll take a look, thanks Jan.

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2018-04-20 05:01    [W:0.102 / U:5.728 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site