lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2017]   [Dec]   [19]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [patch V163 27/51] x86/mm/pti: Populate user PGD
On Tue, 19 Dec 2017, Ingo Molnar wrote:

> * Peter Zijlstra <peterz@infradead.org> wrote:
>
> > On Mon, Dec 18, 2017 at 12:45:13PM -0800, Dave Hansen wrote:
> > > On 12/18/2017 12:41 PM, Peter Zijlstra wrote:
> > > >> I also don't think the user_shared area of the fixmap can get *that*
> > > >> big. Does anybody know offhand what the theoretical limits are there?
> > > > Problem there is the nr_cpus term I think, we currently have up to 8k
> > > > CPUs, but I can see that getting bigger in the future.
> > >
> > > It only matters if we go over 512GB, though. Is the per-cpu part of the
> > > fixmap ever more than 512GB/8k=64MB?
> >
> > Unlikely, I think the LDT (@ 32 pages / 128K) and the DS (@ 2*4 pages /
> > 32K) are the largest entries in there.
>
> Note that with the latest state of things the LDT is not in the fixmap anymore,
> it's mapped separately, via Andy's following patch:
>
> e86aaee3f2d9: ("x86/pti: Put the LDT in its own PGD if PTI is on")
>
> We have the IDT, the per-CPU entry area and the Debug Store (on Intel CPUs) mapped
> in the fixmap area, in addition to the usual fixmap entries that are a handful of
> pages. (That's on 64-bit - on 32-bit we have a pretty large kmap area.)
>
> The biggest contribution to the size of the fixmap area is struct cpu_entry_area
> (FIX_CPU_ENTRY_AREA_BOTTOM..FIX_CPU_ENTRY_AREA_TOP), which is ~180k, i.e. 44
> pages.
>
> Our current NR_CPUS limit is 8,192 CPUs, but even with 65,536 CPUs the fixmap area
> would still only be ~12 GB total - so we are far from running out of space.

We don't run out of space, but the 0-day robot triggered a nasty issue.

The fixmap bottom address, which contains the early_ioremap fixmap area, is:

vaddr_bt = FIXADDR_TOP - FIX_BTMAP_BEGIN * PAGE_SIZE

If that address is lower than:

vaddr_end = __START_KERNEL_map + KERNEL_IMAGE_SIZE;

then cleanup_highmap() will happily 0 out the PMD entry for the PTE page of
FIX_BTMAP. That entry was set up earlier in early_ioremap_init().

As a consequence the first call to __early_set_fixmap() which tries to
install a PTE for early_ioremap() will crash and burn.

Below is a nasty hack which fixes the problem. Ideally we get all of this
cpu_entry_stuff out of the fixmap. I'll look into that later, but for now
the patch 'fixes' the issue.

Thanks,

tglx
8<-------------
--- a/arch/x86/include/asm/fixmap.h
+++ b/arch/x86/include/asm/fixmap.h
@@ -209,6 +209,8 @@ extern pte_t *kmap_pte;
#define kmap_prot PAGE_KERNEL
extern pte_t *pkmap_page_table;

+extern pmd_t *early_ioremap_page_table;
+
void __native_set_fixmap(enum fixed_addresses idx, pte_t pte);
void native_set_fixmap(enum fixed_addresses idx,
phys_addr_t phys, pgprot_t flags);
--- a/arch/x86/mm/init_64.c
+++ b/arch/x86/mm/init_64.c
@@ -393,6 +393,15 @@ void __init cleanup_highmap(void)
for (; vaddr + PMD_SIZE - 1 < vaddr_end; pmd++, vaddr += PMD_SIZE) {
if (pmd_none(*pmd))
continue;
+ /*
+ * Careful here. vaddr_end might be past the pmd which is
+ * used by the early ioremap stuff. Don't clean that out as
+ * it's already set up.
+ */
+ if (__phys_addr_nodebug((unsigned long) pmd) ==
+ __phys_addr_nodebug((unsigned long) early_ioremap_page_table))
+ continue;
+
if (vaddr < (unsigned long) _text || vaddr > end)
set_pmd(pmd, __pmd(0));
}
--- a/arch/x86/mm/ioremap.c
+++ b/arch/x86/mm/ioremap.c
@@ -27,6 +27,8 @@

#include "physaddr.h"

+pmd_t __initdata *early_ioremap_page_table;
+
/*
* Fix up the linear direct mapping of the kernel to avoid cache attribute
* conflicts.
@@ -709,7 +711,7 @@ void __init early_ioremap_init(void)
pmd = early_ioremap_pmd(fix_to_virt(FIX_BTMAP_BEGIN));
memset(bm_pte, 0, sizeof(bm_pte));
pmd_populate_kernel(&init_mm, pmd, bm_pte);
-
+ early_ioremap_page_table = pmd;
/*
* The boot-ioremap range spans multiple pmds, for which
* we are not prepared:

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2017-12-19 19:09    [W:0.120 / U:1.556 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site